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Today's News

  • Year in Review – #4

    The county got some unwanted national attention in early October when Forbes.com, the online version of Forbes magazine, ranked the county as “the most vulnerable town” in America.

    On this top-10 list, Forbes.com cited the county’s 12.2 percent unemployment rate for August. It also noted that only 18.6 percent of the workforce here has an associate’s degree or higher and said about 20 percent of residents live at or below the poverty line.

  • Year in Review – #7

    Van Wyck native Shawn Crawford made many Lancaster County residents proud when he made his second appearance in the Olympic Games in Beijing in August.

    Crawford, an Indian Land High School graduate and a former All-American runner at Clemson University, was looking to repeat the success he had in the 2004 Olympics in Athens. There, he won the gold medal in the 200-meter race.

    But Crawford wasn’t able to repeat his 2004 success. Usain Bolt of Jamaica overshadowed all other runners in the 2008 games, winning three gold medals, including the medal for the 200 meter.

  • Year in Review – #10

    In early June, Lancaster City Council pulled $198,000 in funding to See Lancaster, a nonprofit group that promotes downtown business revitalization and economic development in the county.

    See Lancaster receives most of its funding from the city’s hospitality tax revenue, which is generated from the 2-cents-per-dollar tax on food and beverages sold at restaurants in the city.

  • Year in Review – #9

    Retired Lancaster police officer Ray Knight was just trying to help at a wreck scene on Lynwood Circle when he was shot in the face on June 27.

    As Knight approached the car, the occupants ran in the opposite direction, and one of those occupants shot Knight, Sheriff Johnny Cauthen said.

    Knight was the second person shot in that area that night; he had no idea the occupants of the wrecked car were somehow connected to a shooting.

    “He was going to render aid – doing what he was trained to do and was brutally shot,” Cauthen said.

  • Jazz up TV tailgating this bowl season

    Your favorite college football team has made it to a bowl game. Congratulations!

    Your game plan includes hosting a get-together with family and friends around the TV set to root on your favorite team.

    Tailgating around the TV gives you a great opportunity to add a little special menu flavor to the festivities.

    Since the kitchen is only a room or two away, you can think outside the normal tailgating line-up that you are limited to in a stadium parking lot.

  • BB gun spree shatters windows

    As Lancaster County residents were spreading holiday cheer last week, someone else was busy spraying BB pellets at vehicles and homes.

    According to Lancaster Police Department reports, there were at least 16 separate incidents of property being damaged between Dec. 23 and Sunday by what appears to be a BB gun.

  • Municipal officials talk about 2009 plans

    Lancaster Mayor Joe Shaw said the most important project the city will tackle in 2009 is the expansion of the solid waste transfer station.

    In July, County Council and Lancaster City Council agreed to share use of the transfer station, with the city assuming control of the county’s solid waste deposited there.

    The station at 1309 Lynwood Drive is a temporary holding site where trash is transferred after it’s picked up curbside.

  • Community rallies to help those in need

    Chris Sardelli, our newest reporter, said he was surprised at how quickly the donations poured into the revived Christmas Basket Fund.

    We weren’t. We told him that Lancaster folks have a way of rallying to help others. The Christmas Basket Fund is just one example. Actually, there wasn’t going to be a fund this year.

    The fund, which started 49 years ago, collects money and provides food vouchers or gift cards for families in need.

  • Time to watch spending

    It’s hard to find a bright spot in the current national recession. But if there is a silver lining, perhaps it will be in a new approach to the way state government spends.