Today's News

  • Bauknight's well-known Springs photo has a story behind it

    Stories on Col. Elliott White Springs abound.

    “So many people can tell tales about the colonel and the kind of man he was,” said C.D. “Bubber” Gregory.

    But there is one – that few people know – that can be told.

    The “camera-doesn’t-lie” formal photo taken by the late Lavoy Bauknight, is proof.

    But it’s the one photograph of Springs that was almost never taken.

  • Lancaster Chamber Choir makes a comeback

    A renewal of sorts is under way with the Lancaster Chamber Choir. Having seen a drop in both membership and concert attendance the last two years, they are trying to get the “we’re back,” word out.

    When former director Michael Miller left to pursue a doctorate degree out of state, the choir lost its leader. Margaret Walsh, music director at First United Methodist Church, temporarily took over.

  • A jack of all lanterns


    A jack of all lanterns

    Versatile artist Jamie Ouzts excels in pumpkin carving 

  • Ex-death row inmate talks about 'Smart' choices

    Ron Smart knows a lot about choices.

    Smart, an ex-death row inmate, had the opportunity to speak to students at Buford Middle, Andrew Jackson High and Buford High schools about that very thing Thursday.

    “I can tell you plenty about making the wrong ones,” Smart said during a telephone interview Wednesday. “I spent 46 of the 50-plus year span from March of 1955 to September of 2005 in prison for the bad choices I made. I would say that makes me an authority on what not to do.”

  • Man behind the mill

    Things were looking up in Lancaster in mid-October of 1959.

    Fifty years ago, the undefeated Lancaster High School Blue Hurricanes had just beaten the Clinton High School Red Devils on a soggy, rain-soaked Presbyterian College field.

    Julian Starr, publisher of The Lancaster News, Dr. J.P. Sims and local attorney D. Glenn “Rock” Yarborough had  been named to the Lancaster Chamber of Commerce board of directors.

    Despite an employee’s strike, the Bowater family announced a $30 million expansion at its paper mill along the Catawba River.

  • Technology helps pharmacy with efficiency

    It moves and packages pills in a way you may have never seen before.

    A job that takes a person several minutes has now been reduced to 30 seconds – thanks to a device known as an automatic dispensing system, or ADS.

    For about a year now, Mobley Drugs Inc. has been using an ADS made by the Raleigh, N.C.-based company Rx Medic. The computer-run machine can store more than 200 different medications and dispense them instantly to fill a prescription.

  • Mahaffey now locally owned again

    The scent of freshly baked cookies greets you as you walk through the doors of Mahaffey Funeral Home & Cremation Center.

    Those tasty treats are some of the small things Joe Wilson has introduced to make his business friendlier.

    Wilson is the new owner of Mahaffey Funeral Home, which is Lancaster County’s oldest continually operating funeral establishment. With his purchase in May, the business is now locally owned for the first time since the early 1990s.

  • High-rise landscaping

    A local company has played a role in helping reshape the residential landscape in Uptown Charlotte.

    Majestic Landscaping & Palms, based in Lancaster, was hired earlier this year to deliver and plant windmill palm trees on the rooftop terrace of The Garrison at Graham, a new six-floor loft-style housing development that offers its residents close views of the Charlotte skyline.

    Dennis Donahue, owner of Majestic Landscaping, said his business was contacted in July and did the job on Sept. 25, all in one day.

  • Two pediatricians join new Lancaster practice

    A new pediatrics practice in Lancaster marks the return of a Heath Springs native turned doctor.

    Lancaster Pediatrics opened in July with Dr. Katie Fine. She was joined by Dr. Darniya Powe Belton last month.

    Belton, 31, was born in Lancaster County and is a summa cum laude graduate of Johnson C. Smith University.

  • Crime march set for Oct. 31

    Several Lancaster County residents are planning to spend their Halloween standing up against crime in their neighborhoods.

    Lancaster Alternative Policing Strategy (LAPS), a citizens crime awareness group, is hosting a crime watch march on Oct. 31. The aim is to stop the violence and take back the neighborhoods, said City Councilwoman Tamara Green, who founded LAPS.

    She said the march includes school children, LAPS members, pastors and other citizens.

    “Anyone is welcome to participate,” Green said.