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Today's News

  • School leaders discuss goals, challenges of ’09

    Lancaster County School District Superintendent Dr. Gene Moore said budget issues will be his biggest concern in 2009. 

    As the district deals with another state funding cut – this one for $2.4 million – officials are exploring ways to save money. Moore said the district is dipping into special revenues, such as equity and savings, to make up for the shortfall in what was originally a $78 million budget.

  • Christmas Basket drive tops $16,000

    For a charity drive that was almost nonexistent six weeks ago, the Ward Faulkenberry Memorial Christmas Basket fund has now collected more than $16,000.

    The fund collected $850 since Dec. 30, bringing the total amount collected to $16,631. This amount far exceeds last year’s total of $9,250 and has also surpassed the amount collected in 2001, which was over $15,000.

  • Tranparency in government matters

    Our governor got a lot of attention a week or so ago when he threatened to refuse to borrow unemployment benefits money from the federal government until the South Carolina Employment Security Commission provided some details on how it operates.

    And while the details of that move could make a good column in itself, I think it is worthwhile to use it as an introduction into the issue of “government transparency,” which promises to be a hot topic when the Legislature returns to Columbia this week.

  • Compromise on tower a winning solution

    Ever since the announcement that a new water tower would be built near the Indian Land schools, there has been controversy surrounding it.

    First, people were concerned about the safety of the 1-million-gallon elevated storage tank because of its proximity to the elementary and middle schools.

    Then, once construction got under way, it was labeled a “landmark wart” by Scott Bruntmyer, who lives in the Lakeview Landing neighborhood, which has, unfortunately, a clear view of the tower.

  • Anastasia

    The circumstances surrounding the life of Anastasia – a 17-year-old Russian princess who disappeared in July 1918 – is full of mystery, intrigue and emotion.

    Did the fourth daughter of Tsar Nicholas II survive the Russian Revolution or was she murdered, along with her family, by the Bolshevik secret police?

    Persistent rumors of her possible escape have circulated for more than 90 years, with Anastasia’s life chronicled by books, movies and musicals.

  • Show Warrior pride on IL water tower

    I agree completely with Bennett Gunter’s article regarding the water tower in Indian Land.

    The water tower is on the Indian Land school’s campus and should have “Indian Land – Home of the Warriors” on it.

    What better way is there for the community to show its support for its school and students? 

    I have two kids in middle school. They are now at the age where school spirit is starting to matter.

  • Date of infamy changed our lives

    I was pretty cranky on the morning of Dec. 7, but it was justified.It seems that our national media had forgotten all about what happened on another Sunday morning some 67 years ago and how it changed our lives forever. I haven’t forgotten that day and I never will.

    In about 90 minutes’ time that day, about 2,400 Americans were dead, more than 1,100 were wounded and 18 ships were sunk during the Japanese sneak attack at Pearl Harbor. 

  • Veterans deserve all their eligible benefits

    Question: My husband passed away this summer after a long battle with dementia. He worked hard after leaving the service to set aside a comfortable retirement for us. Unfortunately the majority of this was used to pay for his long term care and other medical expenses.

  • We thank outgoing council members

    Six men who served Lancaster County residents in elected office are stepping down from their seats.

    Audrey Curry, Danny O’Brien and Bill Sumner are vacating their seats on Lancaster City Council, and Wesley Grier, Wayne Kersey and Bryan Vaughn are leaving the posts on County Council at the end of the year.

    We want to thank them for their work, and we hope you will, too.

    Being an elected official on either City Council or Council Council is a tough job.

  • History made on City Council

    History was made at Lancaster City Hall on Wednesday when three new council members were sworn into office.

    For the first time, council has three women serving at the same time, and this is also the first time that the majority of council’s members are black.

    “This speaks well of this city and the county,” Mayor Joe Shaw said. “Let’s work together and exchange ideas for the betterment of the community.”