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Today's News

  • Sumner a man of his word; committed to citizens

    I would like to start by saying how proud I am of Bill Sumner. He ran an honest campaign with no deceit or underhandedness.

    I am biased because he is my dad. I can only hope for the citizens of City Council District 4 that your new council person will be willing to give up family obligations for the city of Lancaster. My dad always responded to the calls of District 4 citizens because when he became a city councilman he made a commitment to you. He is a man of his word, no matter what was going on.

  • Heath Springs Elementary first class everyday

    During the recent political campaign I heard candidates mention the local school districts as the city of Lancaster, Indian Land and the rural districts of Buford and Kershaw. I wanted to remind them that we are in reality, one district. Most of us feel very positive about the school our children or grandchildren attend, and so do I.

  • Writer: Obama not black; he’s biracial

    Please explain to me and your readers why the news media insists on calling Barack Hussein Obama the “first black man to take the presidential oath.”

    He isn’t anymore black than white. He is biracial.

    Rob Emory’s column, “Let’s hope America hasn’t been fooled,” in the Nov. 7 edition of The Lancaster News, hits the nail on the head and accurately alerts everyone to what we may be facing.

    Your newspaper staff is obviously caught up in the moment.

  • Lancaster fortunate to have such great volunteers

    I have been very saddened recently to see the obituaries of two of my good friends, Connie Francavilgia and Sarah Hunter. I worked with the two ladies as volunteers at Springs Memorial Hospital during my early teen years. They as well as my late grandmother, Reba Ballard, gave countless hours to serve as volunteers at the hospital.

  • No Christmas break for blue laws

    The Lord triumphed in County Council chambers Monday night. Council voted against repealing the blue laws in the county through Jan. 4.   County Administrator Steve Willis said he brought up the ordinance for council to consider in light of the national economic downturn. Willis said surrounding counties, such as York, and Union and Mecklenburg in North Carolina, don’t have blue laws, which prohibit the sale of certain items before 1:30 p.m. on Sundays.

  • USCL job fair to host 30 firms

    Lancaster residents will have a chance to meet with prospective employers at a job fair at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster. The job fair will be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday at the Bradley Arts and Sciences Building at USCL.

  • ‘All this can be repaired,’ official says during tour

    The Lancaster County Courthouse is a shadow of its former glory. The inside of the 180-year-old structure, which was heavily damaged by arson on Aug.

  • We must show our gratitude to veterans

    First of all, I would like to personally thank all the veterans for their service to our country.

    I was very disappointed that so few came out to the Veteran’s Day Parade on Nov. 8 to show support for these men and women who have served so we can have the freedoms we still have here in the United States. Some even lost their lives doing so. The very least we can do is show our appreciation and gratitude for what they have done.

  • America is paying price for turning back on God

    I am not a racist. I have never been accused of being racially prejudiced or biased. The following remarks have nothing to do with race, color, nationality or ethnicity.

    I did not vote against Barack Obama because of his race. As a matter of fact, my choice for president was Alan Keyes.

  • Long, Thomas set example for clean campaign race

    No matter the outcome it was a historic race. The winner of the S.C. House District 45 seat was going to be filled by the first woman or the first black since Reconstruction.

    Fort Mill optometrist Deborah Long defeated Lancaster County Council member Fred Thomas in the general election. Long, an Indian Land resident, garnered 11,051 votes, or almost 57 percent of the vote. Thomas, a Lancaster resident, had 8,422 votes, or 43 percent.