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Today's News

  • Money spent on concerts can’t be used to hire cops, firefighters

    The city’s Performing Arts Department has come under fire on budget issues over the past month, with city council just one vote short of eliminating the Performing Arts Series of concerts at its March 13 meeting.
    Council member Hazel Taylor, who voted to kill the concerts, commented in an interview after the meeting that the money should be used for other things like hiring police officers and firefighters.

  • Walking in serious shoes

    It seemed like business as usual at the coroner’s office Thursday – a white board full of notes on different cases and a determined sleuth to determine each cause of death.
    “Treat everything as a homicide until proven otherwise,” Jasmine Mills said as she wrote “domestic violence” under “homicide.”

    Jasmine had been solving cases for hours. And she’s just 13 years old.

  • County weighs $10.8M bond issue to finance recreation needs

    County officials might put a $10.8 million bond referendum before voters in November to fund recreation upgrades across the county.
    Officials are in the initial stages of a plan that would get the measure on the general election ballot Nov. 13.
    If approved, the bond would be used for five projects:
    ◆ Upgrade and expand the Indian Land Recreation Center on U.S. 521, at a cost of $4.5 million.
    ◆ Develop the planned Harrisburg Road Soccer Complex for $2.5 million.  
    ◆ Partly fund the Lindsay Pettus Greenway with $2.5 million.  

  • Combining discovery, preservation

    Archivists are not known for getting down in the dirt.
    You often see them wearing white gloves, to avoid damaging the precious documents and other artifacts that it’s their job to catalog and safely tuck away.
    Brent Burgin has those white gloves, but he was just as comfortable in work gloves over several years, slogging away in the bottom of a pit at the Kolb Site archaeological dig near Darlington with his colleagues from USC Lancaster.

  • Teen without wheels no more

    Daquan Stevenson has a new ride.
    The Kershaw 17-year-old, whose car was totaled by an 18-wheeler in a hit-and-run accident two weeks ago, is back on the road, thanks to a Lancaster couple who read his story in The Lancaster News.
    Stevenson was stopped at the stop sign on West Hilton Street at North Matson Street in Kershaw on March 15 when the trailer of a turning semi slammed into the front end of his 1996 Honda Civic. The truck driver did not stop.

  • Estridge will not run for 5th term

    County council member Jack Estridge, first elected in 2002 to represent the southern part of the county, will not seek a fifth term in office.
    “I think I’ve served long enough, and others are willing to step up,” the 72-year-old Democrat said Friday.
    “I tell you, I have two little great-grandchildren who have really brightened up my life, and I just want to spend as much time as I can with them.”

  • Mentors by chance

    A month after a fire shut down Andrew Jackson Middle School for repairs, its displaced seventh graders have taken on an unexpected role – becoming mentors to the students at Kershaw Elementary School. 

    “It’s been amazing. The kids are enjoying the older students,” said Leslie Bass, a first-grade teacher at KES. “We had one student struggling with math, and the seventh grader sat down and tutored them. 

  • Local Easter events have something for ‘Everybunny’

    Library egg hunt

    Lancaster County Library, 313 S. White St., Lancaster, will hold an Easter egg hunt from 10-11 a.m. March 30. For details, call (803) 285-1502 or e-mail aantonacci@lancastercountysc.net.

    HS Easter egg hunt

  • Candidate Column: I have the education, experience to be county’s next probate judge

    My name is Dee Studebaker. I have been Lancaster County’s associate probate judge for almost two years. I immediately filed to run for probate judge when filing opened at noon March 16 because I am serious about gaining your trust.
    I have the skills, education and experience necessary to serve you as probate judge, and I feel called to public service.  I’ve had the privilege over the past two years to assist and observe the court’s operations while earning the trust and confidence of other personnel and citizens.    

  • Column: Here's how House voted to distribute tax revenues

    The S.C. House last week passed its $8.2 billion version of the state’s general fund budget, sending it to the Senate.
    Our state’s economy is booming, with low unemployment, continued business growth and a thriving tourism industry, so South Carolina brought in $326 million more than it did the year before in recurring dollars that can be used on yearly expenses.
    Here’s a look at what the House did:

    Required expenditures