Today's News

  • A real 'Animal House'

    EDGEMOOR – “Two chickens like this!” the ring man shouts as he reaches inside a crate, pulls out the bird and lifts it into the air.

    Every eye inside the Dixie Stockyard is on the chicken as the bidding starts. 

    The auctioneer immediately barks out a crystal-clear, rhythmic chant trying to coax the most money for the birds from the customers.

    Suddenly, the chant ends just as quickly as it started.

    “Sold,” he yells. The winning bidder smiles and holds up his number for the bookkeeper to see.

  • What will new courtrooms look like?

    As workers prepare to construct flooring at the new county courthouse facilities, county officials are looking for input about the building’s courtrooms.

    On display at the county’s Temporary Judicial Center off S.C. 9 Bypass are plywood mock-ups of the large and small courtrooms, which will be built in the new county courthouse on Main Street in Lancaster.

  • Ice in weather forecast

    Lancaster County could see a “significant icing event” this weekend.

    The National Weather Service placed Lancaster County under a winter storm watch Thursday afternoon. That was expected to change to a warning on Saturday. A winter storm watch means there is a potential for significant snow, sleet or ice accumulations that may impact travel.

  • Pie lovers, unite

    If any American food deserves its own celebration, it’s pie. The American Pie Council has declared Jan. 23 as National Pie Day.

    While Americans didn’t create the first pie (it’s believed the Egyptians did about 2000 B.C. before passing it on to the Greeks who spread it throughout the Roman Empire), it somehow evolved into our national dessert.

    That’s strange considering that early pies were predominantly made from inedible rye crusts, goat cheese and honey.

    But as the popularity of pie increased, so did the combinations.

  • KERSHAW On a night when Andrew Jackson honored its hoops heritage, the Volunteers capped the evening with a stirring win.

    AJ boys coach Dale Reeves called his team’s 57-55 comeback win the team’s “best game of the season.”

    “We want to make the playoffs and what you do in region play determines that,” Reeves said. “We knew we had to go out and win here tonight.

    “We were coming off a tough loss at Central, but we maintained our intensity and focus,” Reeves said.

  • Lancers sign Hammond

    Lancaster High School senior pitcher Trevor Hammond will continue to play at LHS’s Doomsday Corner, but with a different team.

    Hammond, after he caps his LHS baseball career this spring, will have two more seasons at the Bruins’ field.

    The University of South Carolina at Lancaster, which plays its home games at the LHS park, has signed Hammond to play for the Lancers.

    “I’m really excited about playing at USCL,” Hammond said. “I feel the Lancers’ program is on the rise and I want to be a part of that.

  • Jackets wrestlers roll in mat sweep at CMA

    No. 4 Buford High School rolled to a pair of impressive wrestling wins, downing Camden Military, 60-24 and Class AAAA Hartsivlle, 72-12 at CMA on Tuesday night.

    In routing the HHS Red Foxes, BHS had an easy time with six forfeits in posting the 60-point victory. Buford bolted to a 30-0 lead and cruised to the win.

    Jackets’ pin winners with two each in the tri-match included Rashad Cunningham, James Shehane, Zack Wright and Johntrell Caudle.

    Buford, in topping CMS, surged to a 36-6 spread on the way to the 36-point win.

  • Wing King takes off

    It’s a risk to open a new small business, even during good economic times.

    But despite the current downturn in the economy, the owners of Wing King Cafe in Lancaster have been pleasantly overwhelmed at the response to its newest restaurant.

    Wing King Cafe, 426 S.C. 9 Bypass East, opened Dec. 14, and the restaurant has been busy since Day 1, say owners Kim and Bobby Jones and Lori and Brad Hartley.

    “Busy is a good thing,” Lori Hartley said.

  • A reward for top readers

    The suspense came to an all-time high for a group of students at Clinton Elementary School just days after returning to school after the winter break.

    Several fourth-graders in Kristal Salyer’s class had met and exceeded their reading challenge – each reading more than 6,700 minutes worth of books.

    For their effort, Salyer would reward them in a big way.

    But just how?

    It would be a surprise, and they’d have to wait until Jan. 7 to get it.

  • Linking parents to opportunities

    Chris Jacobs didn’t foresee the day when he’d be looking for a job at this stage of his life.

    The Lancaster native had worked in circulation at The State newspaper in Columbia for 13 years before being laid off in March because of company downsizing.

    Jacobs still hasn’t found another job and is now looking for assistance to improve his chances of getting hired.

    He said Erwin Elementary School is lending a helping hand.