Today's News

  • Cook, Coy taken off ballot

    Jesef Williams
    Two of the candidates running for the S.C. House 44 seat will not appear on the June 10 primary ballot.
    Democrat Bob Cook of Kershaw and Republican Joseph Coy of Heath Springs are among nearly 200 candidates statewide affected by last week’s S.C. Supreme Court ruling.
    The ruling, issued on Wednesday, affirms a law saying that candidates who did not file a statement of candidacy the same time they filed their statement of economic interest (SEI) could not be certified to seek office.

  • Recycling Ruckus

    Reece Murphy
    INDIAN LAND – By now, clashes between industry and upper-Panhandle residents as a result of the area’s uneven zoning are well documented; and now there’s another, this time between residents and an Indian Land recycler.
    As part one of a two-part series this week and next, we’ll look at the tensions between the two parties and examine some of the issues behind it.

  • James Williams devises unique way to say thanks

    Gregory A. Summers
    Saying thanks isn’t very hard if you know how.
    James Williams did just that Saturday in his own unassuming way by walking across the Colonial Life Center stage during commencement exercises at the University of South Carolina.
    Williams, only 19, has a lot of people to say thanks to and earning a college degree in social work is his way of doing that.

  • Pantry at HOPE in Lancaster almost bare

    By now, you have probably read the story  on Page 1A about the investigation of the missing money and a missing computer at HOPE in Lancaster.
    If that wasn’t bad enough, there is another pressing issue, too.
    The annual Stamp Out Hunger! food drive set for Saturday, May 12, is a godsend for the agency, but you don’t have to take my word for it. Somebody a lot smarter than me once said a picture is worth a thousand words and I had to see it for myself.

  • Lancaster retiree wins $200,000 in scratch-off lottery ticket game

    S.C. Education Lottery
    A retired Lancaster man has won $200,000 on a scratch-off ticket.
    He beat the 1 in 480,000 odds on the $10 Money Mania scratch-off  ticket to take home the game’s last top prize of $200,000. He told lottery officials the most he had won before was $500.
    The man said he intends to pay off his bills and take a long overdue vacation.

  • Sheriff presents details of potential deputy grant

    Christopher Sardelli
    In preparation for a potential grant that could fund five new sheriff’s deputies, Lancaster County Sheriff Barry Faile recently discussed his plans for the funding.
    Faile spoke at Lancaster County Council’s April 23 meeting about a grant council recently approved to submit to the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • American Tree Farm System strives to stop loss of family woodlands

    Driving through the South Carolina countryside, you will occasionally see a green and white diamond-shaped sign declaring a property to be part of the American Tree Farm System. What does that mean?
    The American Tree Farm System (ATFS) is the country’s largest and oldest network of family-owned forests. More than 83,000 members are managing 26 million acres of America’s forests.

  • Artist-In-Residence

                            From release
    Fran Gardner, a professor of art and art history at the University of South Carolina Lancaster, will spend three weeks in July as the artist-in-residence at Chaco Culture National Historical Park in Chaco Canyon, Nageezi, N.M. 

  • Vote Democrat if you support our education

    Since the 1970s, the Republican strategy in the South has urged white voters to defect from the “civil-rights-supporting Democratic Party.”
    This continued through the years, with attacks on busing and affirmative action, then immigration and welfare. Newt Gingrich recently labeled President Barack Obama “the food stamp president.”  

  • School choice: Why speculate?

    John Adams wasn’t thinking of school choice when he famously stated, “Facts are stubborn
     things,” but his insight can bring clarity to a debate that remains clouded with misleading claims.
    As state lawmakers consider school choice legislation, it is crucial that stubborn facts determine the decisions they make. Any policy dealing with how children are educated in South Carolina deserves nothing less.