.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • The tie that binds

    The late Hobert Skaggs always had a hidden reason behind everything he did.

    The mandolin that 5-year-old Ricky Skaggs found in his bed one Saturday morning some 50 years ago, and the G, C and D chords that Hobert taught his son weren’t just learning tools and a musical instrument.

    It was Hobert’s connection to his Eastern Kentucky childhood that was lost when his brother was killed in World War II.

  • Lantern tour lights up history

    Andrew Jackson State Park will have a different aura Saturday night when stories are woven around burning campfires and shadows cast by flickering candles.

    However, these won’t be ghost stories or tall tales.

    It’s the annual Life in the Waxhaws lantern tour at the park which bears the name of a president. 

    The lantern tour offers a historical look at 18th century life in the Waxhaws during the 1780s when Jackson was a lad.

  • What is The Tribe?

    INDIAN LAND – What started as a simple homework assignment has blossomed into a full-fledged school spirit club at Indian Land High School.

    As part of an assignment in her advanced-placement English class last year, then-junior Taylor Altier was asked to write a proposal about what she would change at her school. Altier, 17, already had an idea about what could be improved.

  • Author mentors young writers

    INDIAN LAND – A few young aspiring writers recently got the chance to receive one-on-one mentorship from a nationally known author.

    Caroline B. Cooney, who has written dozens of books for teenagers, worked with a select group of students at Indian Land Middle and Indian Land High schools on two separate days earlier this month.

    Cooney, now a Sun City Carolina Lakes resident, saw the high school students Nov. 3 and the middle school students Tuesday. The workshop sessions were held at the Del Webb Library at Indian Land.

  • I have a hard time spelling plagiarism

    Someone recently asked if all of my “Remember When” ideas come from the Internet. 

    The answer is no. Since the first column in 2003, the stuff I write every Sunday is solely based on my memories of growing up along Chesterfield Avenue in downtown Lancaster.

    I catch a fit trying to spell plagiarism, let alone trying to do it.

    Now, if by chance, you see more than one reference to the washing of my dog, Tiger, well, bless your heart. That means you’re keeping up. After all, I gave my favorite all-time dog more than one bath.

  • Boy Scouts to roll out hall of fame on Nov. 7

    With its timeless traditions, foundation of leadership and emphasis on community service, the Boy Scouts of America has made a difference.

    Since its inception, volunteer scout leaders have worked to instill the values of duty, honor and country in young men to provide a strong foundation for future generations.

    Until now, many of these local scouters have been unnoticed, except by those whose lives they have impacted.

    But that’s about to change, said Art Harris, Lancaster district executive for the Palmetto Council for the Boy Scouts of America.

  • McGriff fair, open-minded, represents all citizens

    I write in support of my friend and colleague, Charlene McGriff, as she makes her bid for Lancaster County Council District 2 seat. I met Charlene in 1992 after my father-in-law, T.T. Barnes, realized that both Charlene and I were  concerned with the plight of young males in Lancaster County.

  • AJ Middle volleyball team 'made us proud'

    This letter is in regard to a great group of young ladies and the record they accomplished as members of the Andrew Jackson Middle School volleyball team. The girls ended up the season with a 16-1 record.

    They practiced hard, learned a lot, played well and made us proud. I think their coach is the kind of good influence you want young people to learn from. I didn’t make it to every game, but I know most of their parents, grandparents and family members did. It was wonderful for their support.

  • Hydrick's right for the job

    BUFORD Dillon Hydrick, a three-year veteran on the Buford High School football team, is in his first year starting for the Yellow Jackets, but he’s right for the job.

    He’s regarded as a handful playing fullback, because he has a perfect build for the position.

    “His size at fullback makes him hard to bring down. He loves meeting tacklers in the open field, because he likes to lower the boom,” Buford head coach Mike Wells said.

    Hydrick, at 5-9, 195 pounds, also uses his size playing middle linebacker.

  • Tri-County coaches salute three county football standouts

    A trio of Lancaster County players drew top honors at the weekly meeting of the Founders Tri-County Football Coaches Association on Tuesday.

    Indian Land High School’s Dimitri Anthony and Jarrell Robinson were honored for their defensive play in the Division II awards.

    Lancaster High School’s Marshawn Rhoney was saluted for his stellar defensive play in the Bruins’ 23-20 road win over Ridge View.

    Rhoney, a senior defensive lineman, racked up 13 tackles to earn the Division I Defensive Lineman of the Week.