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Today's News

  • Don’t wait too late to express views about USCL

    I am writing in reference to Furman Joye’s letter, “Relax, Sanford’s proposal just that – proposal.” Joye said we shouldn’t make rude and crude remarks. He’s right. We shouldn’t make personal attacks on a person’s character.

    However, I don’t think we should write condescending letters either. When Joye wrote “Relax, Little Red Hen, the sky is not falling,” he was writing to adults as if they were children.

    Sanford’s proposal is simply a proposal. I think most of us get that.

  • Cut spending before closing USCL

    I am writing in regard to our so-called governor. Lancaster has already lost more than it can stand. Lancaster Springs Plant is only a memory. Grace Complex gone. Elliott, Leroy and Close plants are all gone. Our jobs have gone overseas. No one is hiring. Now Gov. Mark Sanford wants to close our college.

  • Lancaster area, USC – successful partnership

    It was early 1959. The Lancaster Chamber of Commerce had announced that a major goal for 1958-59 was to investigate the possibility of establishing a college in Lancaster.

    Julian Starr, publisher of The Lancaster News, was named chairman of the committee to pursue this goal. As Chamber of Commerce manager, it was my responsibility to assist Starr and his committee in their work.

  • Chance meeting brings duo here

    Who would believe that an event halfway around the world could bring a classical cello and piano concert to Lancaster?

    But that’s the connection that’s bringing the Jesselson/Fugo Duo to First Presbyterian Church, 700 N. Main St., on Sunday for a 2:30 p.m. performance.

    In 1981, retired University of South Carolina at Lancaster English professor Betty Hodges traveled to China.

    Since then, Hodges has regularly joined other “Chinaphiles” for reunions.

  • Let’s help LHS band get new uniforms

    If you know any member of the Lancaster High School band, you probably know what the band needs and what its members are up to.

    They’re on a mission to raise between $30,000 and $36,000 to buy new uniforms to perform in during the fall marching season.

    It’s never easy to raise funds, and tough economic times don’t make it any easier, that’s for sure. But we hope you’ll support the band’s efforts. The band’s uniforms are now 14 years old. It’s time for the band to retire them.

  • Foundation seeks to help those in need

    One woman sleeps in her car at night. A man without a car walked nine miles to HOPE requesting food and other necessities.

    There are many similar stories. Elaine Adkins, executive director of HOPE, shared some of the stories with the Breakfast Rotary Club Wednesday morning.

    HOPE, which stands for Helping Other People Effectively, distributes food and utility assistance to those in need in Lancaster.

  • Want to participate in Kidney Walk?

    ROCK HILL – Learn about putting together a team for the tri-county Kidney Walk, which raises funds for kidney patients, at a luncheon slated for 11:30 a.m. Feb. 18 at Outback Steakhouse at 1319 River Run Court in Rock Hill.

    The Kidney Walk will be April 30 at Winthrop Lake at Winthrop University, with registration beginning at 5 p.m. and the walk starting at 6 p.m.

    The walk is sponsored by Nephrology Associates and Fresenius. 

    There are 30,000 people in York, Lancaster and Chester counties who have kidney disease.

  • Crawford confirms returning Olympic medal

    Van Wyck native Shawn Crawford confirmed last week that he gave his Olympic silver medal to Churandy Martina, who finished second in the 200 meters, but was later disqualified for running out of his lane.

    It was reported in December that Crawford had returned the medal to Martina, who posted photos of himself with the medal on his Web site, but Crawford did not confirm it then.

  • IL resident angry over burning trash

    INDIAN LAND – Charles McConnell has enjoyed living in his Indian Land home. But an increase in trash fires in his neighborhood has left him fired up.

    McConnell, who has lived at his Kohut Road home for more than 14 years, said the problems began about two years ago when residents in nearby rental trailers and owners of commercial lots began burning piles of trash. Walking around his neighborhood, he has seen residents from at least seven different homes burning trash on just his road alone.

  • Schools ask for leeway in spending

    The local school district has joined the growing chorus of school districts in asking for leeway from the state in addressing budget shortfalls.

    The local school board passed a resolution last week that asks the General Assembly for program and spending flexibility.

    The vote was 6-0. Board member Janice Dabney was absent.