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Today's News

  • Teen pleads in fatal crash

    Susan Hardin told a judge on Thursday that she and her husband, Chuck, still call their daughter’s cell phone every day just to hear her voice mail message.

    Their daughter, 15-year-old Elyse Hardin, died in a car crash on West Shiloh Unity Road on Dec. 29, 2009. She had gotten a new cell phone for Christmas, just four days before the crash.

    The teenager behind the wheel before the deadly crash, Devin Rodgers, 16, pleaded guilty in family court on Thursday to reckless homicide.

  • Paper did poor job of covering TEA Party

    I believe that subscribers to The Lancaster News look in each issue for the coverage on the major events that happen around the county. I, for one, was disappointed that there was no coverage of the TEA Party of July 3 until July 9, or until the third paper after the event.

    After the wait, the coverage consisted of two faded black and white photos that failed to provide any coverage of the meeting. The people of Lancaster County need to be informed that the TEA Party is not a political event.

  • Wreck victim seeking information

    I want to thank everyone who stopped to help me when I was hit in the rear turning in my driveway on Grace Avenue on July 7.

    The driver didn’t stop. She just kept going. It was a black car and has front-end damage from the wreck. Two men got the tag number and gave the number to the Fort Lawn Police Department. We still need that tag number. I was so addled I didn’t get the names of the men who got the tag number. If you have information about the tag number or have seen a car fitting this description, please call and share that information.

  • Can property values handle aviation corridor?

    My first thoughts after reading the aviation corridor public hearing notice and glancing at the map overlay was that it won’t impact me because I don’t do much flying. But then reading that it’s a rezoning effort by the county raised at least one eyebrow.

  • Local workers want jobs with projects

    I am a Lancaster native. I have had my own brick masonry business since 1994 and I’ve been a brick mason for 25 years.

    I have never had trouble getting work, but it is different now. I have four other brick masons working for me.

  • Saving old jail is important to county

    There has been much discussion about saving Lancaster’s historic jail. There are those who think it is not worth saving for a number of reasons. Probably the prime reason for some is the repair costs.

    Other reasons include a lack of understanding of the significance of the jail. Therefore, there is no appreciation for its history nor the noted architect who designed it.

  • Tomatoes get their day in court

    Some legal matters are so important that they make it before the U.S. Supreme Court.

    In 1893, one of the greatest legal cases of all time was put to rest when Chief Justice Melville Fuller and associate judges Stephen Field, John Harlan, Horace Gray, Samuel Blatchford, David Brewer, Henry Brown, George Shiras Jr. and Howell Jackson unanimously ruled that a tomato was indeed a vegetable and not a fruit.

    No, this is not some gag.  The case – Nix v. Hedden – addressed whether a tomato was classified as a fruit or vegetable.

  • Writer offers history lessons to Ostram

    I am writing this response to Robert Ostram’s letter, “Don’t bother saving old jail.” Ostram wrote, “The editorial mentioned Robert Mills, the architect who designed the jail. I have never heard of him. Now, if he was Frank Lloyd Wright, that would be different.”

    Please allow me to enlighten Mr. Ostram. Robert Mills (Aug. 12, 1781 – March 3, 1855) is sometimes called the first native born American to become a professional architect. Charles Bulfinch perhaps has a clearer claim to this honor.

  • Historic jail should be preserved

    This letter is in response to the gentleman who has the opinion that the historic Lancaster County jail is not worth saving. He seemed to take great pride in knowing about the great architect, Frank Lloyd Wright, but admitted not knowing anything about another great architect, Robert Mills, who was born almost 100 years before Wright.

  • House speaker should rise above partisanship

    South Carolinians have a right to know the answer to this question from the candidates in the 5th Congressional District: “If elected in November, whom will you support as the next speaker of the House?”

    Considering the divisiveness and partisan struggles currently running through Congress, it’s crucial to know where congressional candidates stand on this important issue.