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Today's News

  • Fundraiser to benefit group that helps horses

    VAN WYCK – Mandela, a blondish Belgian draft horse, gives a loud whinny when Katie Holme comes out of the shed with a bowl of grain for him.

    Even though Mandela is about 700 pounds underweight, he just started showing interest in nibbling hay over the last couple of days. His hips jut out from under his golden coat, and butterflies land on them as he eats.

    Good Samaritans rescued Mandela and brought him to Healing Horses, a nonprofit organization run by Holme.

    His rescuers found him tied to a tree. He was likely surviving, barely, by eating tree bark.

  • HOPE to move back to its home

    HOPE in Lancaster will move back into its old digs next week.

    The charity organization, which assists families with rent and utility payments and provides a food pantry, moved into a temporary location on Arch Street 18 months ago, having outgrown its space at 2008 Pageland Highway.

    Since then, renovations have been going on at its permanent home, which it also shares with Lancaster County Emergency Medical Services. With the assistance of YouthBuild, two new offices, a new food room and storage room have been added on to HOPE’s portion of the building.

  • $100K for USCL

    Springs Memorial Hospital is helping with the effort to fund a new classroom building at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster.

    On Monday, officials from the hospital presented USCL with a check for $100,000 that will go to the campus’ 50th anniversary fundraising campaign.

    USCL has raised $3.1 million during the campaign – $2.7 million of which will go toward the new classroom building. The structure will house faculty, staff and students in the general curriculum of the arts and sciences.

  • How to treat bee stings

    In most cases, bee stings are a minor problem that can be treated at home. Here’s how:

    – A bee will leave behind a stinger attached to a venom sac. Look for a small dark object like a splinter. Try to remove it as quickly as possible with tweezers. The stinger is a self-contained unit that includes a barb, a venom sac and muscles that can continue to pump venom into the bloodstream for 20 minutes after it was left behind. Wasps, yellow jackets and hornets don't leave their stingers in the skin.

  • Dig In

    In the PS2 game, “Garfield: Lasagna World Tour,” the lovable orange cat explores Egypt, Italy and Mexico in search of clues needed to win his weight in his favorite dish.

    In the world of video games, that might work.

    But in real life, Garfield might be headed in the wrong direction. He won’t find a whiff of lasagna in “the Boot,” the Land of the Pharaohs or in the City of Palaces.

    According to the BBC, he would only find his one love in Great Britain.

    That’s right.

    Blimey!

  • I can swim like an anchor

    Every time, I see a youngster splashing in a swimming pool, I stare at my feet.

    Among the things I never mastered was learning to swim.

    My inability to tread water was a great embarrassment, but I just couldn’t muster up enough gumption to learn.

    In later life, aboard troop ships, I always made it a point to become overly familiar with every lifeboat. But I’m getting a little ahead of myself.

    You know, I would’ve made a good anchor. For some reason, whenever I jumped into a body of water, I automatically sank to the bottom.

  • Bee-ware of summer pests

    Charlie Bundy would rather be safe than sorry.

    If Bundy is out working at his farm in the Tabernacle community or anywhere he might encounter a bee, hornet, wasp or yellow jacket, he will have an emergency epinephrine autoinject (EpiPen) nearby.

    Epinephrine is used to treat life-threatening allergic reactions to insect bites, foods, medications, latex and other allergens.

    “I’m going to be cautious,” Bundy said. “Sometimes, you can spend all day out in the country and not see a soul. You do what you have to do, I guess.”

  • Fire guts abandoned house

    It took about 25 firefighters to put out a fire at an abandoned house on Saturday night.

    Lancaster County Fire Marshal Stephen Blackwelder said firefighters received a call at 11:53 p.m. Saturday about a fire at 1836 Grace Ave. The Gooches Crossroad, McDonald Green and Bell Town fire departments responded to the blaze.

    Blackwelder said the fire was well developed when firefighters arrived with flames soaring from the roof of the house.

    “They attacked the fire once they were there and the last trucks left about two and a half hours later,” he said.

  • Coroner to unveil new office space

    Local public officials, rescue workers and funeral home managers will have a chance to tour the new county coroner’s office on Thursday.

    Coroner Mike Morris will unveil his department’s new offices and morgue during a grand opening, drop-in and tour on Thursday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The new offices are located at 717 S. Main St., the former Mike Blackmon Construction building, next door to Hartley’s Appliance. There will be a ribbon-cutting ceremony at 10 a.m.

  • Mayor’s race taking shape

    Joe Shaw will seek another term as Lancaster’s mayor.

    Shaw, who’s been the city’s mayor for 28 years, said Tuesday that he will file for the post after the filing period begins Monday.

    He plans to make a formal announcement within the next week or so.

    “I will run,” he said. “I’m definitely running.”

    Shaw didn’t want to discuss specifics Tuesday, but said he’ll talk about issues and reasons for running fairly soon.

    Is Blackmon-Brace running?