Today's News

  • Lancers drop three in weekend action

    The University of South Carolina at Lancaster baseball team is now 4-4 after dropping three of four games over the weekend.

    The Lancers’ four-game series with Stanley Community College (N.C.) included USCL’s home opener, a twin bill split with the Eagles, 4-3 loss, 16-2 win on Saturday.

    Stanley won the opener Saturday afternoon at the Lancaster High School baseball field where it took a 4-3 win over the Lancers in eight innings.

    Doubleheaders feature two 7-inning games.

  • Willis county’s Employee of Quarter

    Teresa Willis received a unique birthday gift this year.

    Willis, 41, a longtime employee at the Lancaster County Parks & Recreation Department, learned Feb. 5 that she had been named the county’s Employee of the Quarter. Making the day even better, it was also her birthday.

    “It was a nice little birthday present for me,” Willis said. “It’s just an honor to be selected. And this time I was up against several other people. It was a big honor.”

  • Marsh reflects on success, upbringing in Lancaster

    Eugene Marsh was spit on regularly and was called the N-word on a daily basis.

    Times were tough, to say the least, for Marsh, one of four black students who integrated Lancaster High School in 1965.

    That was when integration was voluntary, and Marsh said it was easy for him to tell he wasn’t wanted at Lancaster High.

    Marsh’s life started out as a foster child on East Dunlap Street in Lancaster. He graduated high school in 1967 in what he recalls as a segregated and racist town.

    Opportunities weren’t simply handed to him.

  • Mickles recall changes since 1940s

    KERSHAW – John “J.T.” and Mable Mickle have seen a lot of changes for black Americans in their lives.

    J.T., 87, served in the U.S. Army during World War II, while the military was still segregated and later became one of the first blacks to work in manufacturing with DuPont in Camden.

    Mable, 82, was a teacher who helped integrate a Kershaw school in the late 1960s.

    Both grew up in Kershaw, J.T. on the east side, and Mable on the west. The couple celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary on Dec. 2, 2009.

    World War II  veteran

  • Will address issue affect census count?

    As Lancaster County readies for the 2010 U.S. Census, many Indian Land residents are worried about how their responses will be counted.

    Ted Hoover, vice president of the Indian Land Action Council, has spoken to several Indian Land residents who are concerned their census data could be accidentally counted in York County, affecting Lancaster County’s chances for school funding, road improvements or extra representation at the county and state levels.

    Their fear stems from the confusion between who lives in Indian Land and who lives in neighboring Fort Mill.

  • Lancaster native gives $1M to Clemson center

    CLEMSON – Investments by Lancaster native C. Tycho Howle and an anonymous private sector partner, along with a state match, total $4 million to support an endowed chair position in the Cyber-Institute Center of Economic Excellence (CoEE) at Clemson University.

    Howle and the anonymous private sector partner each invested $1 million to support the research and infrastructure of the center, and that will be matched by the state.

  • Cutting back

    Roses always make a dazzling appearance on Valentine’s Day.

    But if you want the roses planted in your yard to cause a similar stir in upcoming months, now is the time to get started.

    February is still too early to cut back many plants, but it is the perfect time to prune roses.

    “The old story goes that if you prune roses on President’s Day, you’ll have blooms on Mother’s Day,” said Betsy Steele of Lancaster Garden Club.

  • Sew what?

    It’s pretty evident that Janet Nelson has a strong attachment to sewing.

    Nelson shows it everywhere she goes with a personalized license plate that reads “LV2QWLT.”

    Someone once asked her if it meant that she loved to quilt or lived to quilt.

    “I told ’em both,” Nelson said in a 2007 interview.

    For Nelson, that love of fabric hasn’t changed, but the fabric of her life sure has.

    The woman who loves and lives to quilt is just hanging on by a thread these days as her life slowly and silently slips away.

  • Blood Be Upon Your Head

    For more than 200 years, the debate has raged over what happened in eastern Lancaster County between British Lt. Col. Banastre Tarleton and Col. Abraham Buford’s Virginia Detachment.

    What is known is that on May 29, 1780, Tarleton’s dragoons and mounted infantry caught up with the Continentals about 3 p.m.

    Within 15 minutes, 113 of Buford’s infantry had been killed, 150 were wounded and 53 were missing or captured.

    Tarleton’s force of 275 men had only four killed and 15 wounded.

  • I don't hoard, I just forget

    I can identify with the folks on this new cable television show who have an inability to part with belongings they should’ve thrown out long ago.

    At one time, I conceived a plan to sort our accumulated junk and haul it off to the green boxes by the racetrack on a regular basis.

    However, since retirement, that’s kind of got shoved to the back of the drawer, so to speak.

    Of course, I can’t blame anybody else. I have fallen down on my job.

    But in my defense, stuff just looks different now.