Today's News

  • Know signs, symptoms of diabetes

    The numbers are staggering.

    Every 25 seconds, someone in America is diagnosed with diabetes.

    Right now, there are 23.6 million Americans living with diabetes. That’s almost 8 percent of the United States population.

    There are nearly six million more people living with diabetes who don’t know it. That includes an estimated 415,000 South Carolinians, said Lori Moseley, program manager of the Diabetes Education Clinic at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster.

  • Retrieved bowl stirs WWII memories for Billy Ray Deese

    At times, the line between love and hate can be paper thin.

    That notion is one Billy Ray “Reb” Deese can attest to when he holds the bowl displayed on the kitchen table of his home.

    Most wouldn’t give the white glazed china dish a second glance. But that bowl – and how it ended up on Holly Dale Drive – is the story of Deese’s life. For Deese, it’s more second chance than second glance.

  • County maps out needs at its planning session

    Software improvements, better equipment and larger county facilities were all items discussed at Lancaster County Council’s recent county planning session.

    Held earlier this month, council met for its annual planning session to discuss priority projects for the county. This includes programmatic priorities, such as improved information technology services for county departments, as well as capital priorities such as the construction of bridges or road resurfacing. Council also discussed potential areas for cuts and cost savings.

  • Authorities believe man accidentally shot himself with stolen gun

    INDIAN LAND – A Fort Mill man apparently accidentally shot himself with a stolen weapon after a burglary and robbery at an Indian Land home early Thursday.

    Larry Joe Smith, 29, of 113 Allison St., Fort Mill, was taken to Carolinas Medical Center in Charlotte after the incident, said Lt. Mike Baker of the York County Sheriff’s Office. His condition was unavailable on Thursday afternoon.

  • Group to hold crime march

    Kimberly Cox remembers the strong support from other residents as they marched the streets of Lancaster in a stand against violence.

    This was in October, when Lancaster Alternative Policing Strategy (LAPS) hosted its first crime awareness march.

    That day, people of all ages joined together to make a statement against violence and crime.

    Cox, vice-president of LAPS, hopes for a similar outcome this weekend.

    LAPS is holding its second crime march, starting at 10 a.m. Saturday outside Southside Early Childhood Center, 500 Hampton Road, Lancaster.

  • 'Eggstravaganza' set for Saturday

    One Easter event this weekend will not only allow children to collect eggs, but will also give them a chance to win one of several special prizes.

    The Lancaster Downtown Business Association is hosting its first-ever Easter Eggstravaganza on Saturday.

    Children will be able to stop by 13 different businesses in downtown Lancaster that are each serving as an “egg station.” The participants will roam from one location to the next, collecting a plastic egg at each stop that is filled with candy and other treats.  

  • Yard sale to benefit Family Promise

    If you have any unused clothes, accessories or appliances laying around the house, start gathering them. Those items may go a long way in helping the underprivileged in Lancaster County.

    Family Promise of Lancaster, a network of churches that provide housing for the homeless, is preparing to host a major yard sale on April 24.

  • More than 30 guns turned in at local drive

    The Rev. Otis Lathan will never forget the look of despair on the face of a Lancaster mother who had just lost her second son to a violent crime.

    Lathan, pastor at Pleasant Grove Missionary Baptist Church, has given the eulogies for two brothers, both of whom were younger than 30 when they died. The most recent was the victim of a fatal shooting in January.

    As Lathan glanced at their anguished mother during the funeral, he said he knew something had to be done to help eliminate senseless violence.

    His idea was a gun buy-back program.

  • Fight for life comes to Fantasia Farms

    Jimmy Mastranunzio is pushing 40.

    He’s a typical dad who worries about his four children, Haley, Tanner, Jaxon and Kevin and his wife Cyndi.

    And he’d like to talk to them, but he can’t.

    His body has robbed him of that ability and is slowly robbing him of the things most of us take for granted, said his best friend Lauri Pistolis.

    Diagnosed with an incurable disease called amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, in 2005, Pistolis said no one knows if Mastranunzio will see his next birthday.

  • County Council debates rezones

    After 30 years of living along Country Club Drive in Lancaster, Bob Hunter worried a newly proposed rezoning could damage his neighborhood.

    Hunter became concerned after hearing that a tract of land about 300 yards from where he lives could soon be turned into apartment buildings. He urged Lancaster County Council a few weeks ago not to approve the rezoning.

    “People who rent property do not take care of the property,” Hunter said. “When they move, they leave stuff around.”