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Today's News

  • Writer asks to open Animal Control on Saturdays

    Nov. 7 was truly a special day at Lancaster County Animal Control. The Humane Society of Lancaster County held an open house to dedicate the new sign it has provided to help folks find the shelter. Lots of families came. As a result, puppies, dogs and cats were adopted to go to good, loving homes instead of being euthanized. Isn’t this the way it is supposed to be?

  • Boeing announcement is god news for our state

    The S.C. Legislature went back to Columbia for an “emergency” session recently. The reason that legislators were given for returning – and indeed something we dealt with while we were there – was a fix to our state’s employment security laws.

    And while that fix was crucial (I hope to write more about that in my next column), it pales in the long term to the other matter that dropped on our desks.

  • School board right to set political guidelines

    The Lancaster County school board is taking the right steps now to initiate a policy that will spell out what political activity is allowed on school grounds and what is not.

    The board gave its first approval of such a policy at its Oct. 20 meeting and is expected to consider it for final approval this month.

    The policy is needed so candidates for office will have a rule book to play by.

  • Will county road policy address the real issue?

    There’s a saying about a road to a certain unpleasant place being paved with good intentions. That may be the case with a new policy that County Council passed last week.

    The resolution on the use of county vehicles by employees sets monetary penalties when county employees are found negligent when damage is caused to county equipment.

    The policy says an accident review board will decide if an employee is negligent in incidents where damage is caused to county equipment.

  • Legislators misinformed about unemployment benefits extension

    By the time this hits print, the General Assembly will already have reconvened to take up one specific topic – extended unemployment benefits.

    Somewhere in the 1,200-page federal stimulus bill, there was an opportunity for South Carolina to obtain funds for an additional 20 weeks of benefits by changing the measure used to trigger emergency jobless benefits, which states give out during times of high unemployment.

  • Mother proud of Buford football team

    Nearing the end of another football season I thought it was the perfect time to praise the Buford Yellow Jackets 2009-2010 varsity football team. Even though the team does not get the praise that they deserve, parents, grandparents, other family and friends could not be more proud of them for making it this far into playoffs. The show of support this past Friday night for their game against Ninety-Six was absolutely wonderful. These young men have proven that they can win even against the better ranked teams as they proved by beating unbeaten McBee High School.

  • Need to give is now even more important in tough economy

    I was recently invited to speak to a civic club about my views on the stimulus, and whether the promises that it would create jobs are being fulfilled.

    I was chosen to speak on the issue because I had publicly given my assessment that the economic downturn was used as an excuse to spend money we don’t have in the name of economic recovery, and that the stimulus hasn’t worked as advertised.

    More than seven months after the bill passed, the national unemployment rate is 9.8 percent – a 26-year high.

  • I hope I get to keep my eye

     

  • Obama’s presidency in trouble

    Nine months in and President Barack Obama’s administration is in trouble. This is perhaps most evident in his health-care initiative, an important concern that he has made central to his first year in office. Unfortunately, his administration has mishandled the issue, allowing it to spiral out of control and threaten to become a political liability.

  • President should come out of closet

    I live in Lancaster, Pa., and recently was at a veterans administration clinic there for some lab work. The waiting room was crowded and there were several conversations under way when I got there.

    In the corner was a TV set, which was tuned to CNN. When the news turned to the war in Afghanistan, the room grew silent as we all watched and listened. Eight United States servicemen were killed, the reporter said, making October one of the worst months for U.S, casualties since the war began. Several observers in the waiting room shook their heads in silence.