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Today's News

  • Jackets wrestlers roll in mat sweep at CMA

    No. 4 Buford High School rolled to a pair of impressive wrestling wins, downing Camden Military, 60-24 and Class AAAA Hartsivlle, 72-12 at CMA on Tuesday night.

    In routing the HHS Red Foxes, BHS had an easy time with six forfeits in posting the 60-point victory. Buford bolted to a 30-0 lead and cruised to the win.

    Jackets’ pin winners with two each in the tri-match included Rashad Cunningham, James Shehane, Zack Wright and Johntrell Caudle.

    Buford, in topping CMS, surged to a 36-6 spread on the way to the 36-point win.

  • Wing King takes off

    It’s a risk to open a new small business, even during good economic times.

    But despite the current downturn in the economy, the owners of Wing King Cafe in Lancaster have been pleasantly overwhelmed at the response to its newest restaurant.

    Wing King Cafe, 426 S.C. 9 Bypass East, opened Dec. 14, and the restaurant has been busy since Day 1, say owners Kim and Bobby Jones and Lori and Brad Hartley.

    “Busy is a good thing,” Lori Hartley said.

  • A reward for top readers

    The suspense came to an all-time high for a group of students at Clinton Elementary School just days after returning to school after the winter break.

    Several fourth-graders in Kristal Salyer’s class had met and exceeded their reading challenge – each reading more than 6,700 minutes worth of books.

    For their effort, Salyer would reward them in a big way.

    But just how?

    It would be a surprise, and they’d have to wait until Jan. 7 to get it.

  • Linking parents to opportunities

    Chris Jacobs didn’t foresee the day when he’d be looking for a job at this stage of his life.

    The Lancaster native had worked in circulation at The State newspaper in Columbia for 13 years before being laid off in March because of company downsizing.

    Jacobs still hasn’t found another job and is now looking for assistance to improve his chances of getting hired.

    He said Erwin Elementary School is lending a helping hand.

  • Bluegrass on steroids

    Music has a way of lifting your spirits.

    Just ask Jere and Sandy Cherryholmes.

    In 1999, their oldest daughter, Shelly, 20, died in her sleep from respiratory failure.

    To cope with the loss, Jere, a carpenter for the Los Angeles County school system and Sandy, who was homeschooling their children, Cia, B.J., Skip and Molly Kate, took the family to a nearby bluegrass festival.

    There – while listening to Jim & Jesse and the Virginia Boys – the Cherryholmes found healing.

    They also found inspiration and a new calling on their lives.

  • Use it or lose it

    These days, fitness means more than a walk on the treadmill for those at Prime Time for Seniors Center.

    A group there is learning how to exercise their minds through Breakfast for your Brain.

    Based on Dr. Marge Engleman’s “Aerobics of the Mind,” the weekly course teaches seniors to take mental fitness seriously.

    Until about 25 years ago, most researchers believed that memory loss was a part of the natural aging process.

  • I'll let the old folks do the worrying

    Make-believe gives a growing boy the chance to take a magical trip where his imagination rules the roost.

    There are no illegal substances involved, and even better, there are no folks judging or finding fault with your choices.

    That’s the beauty of being a youngster.

    But no matter how hard we try, reality eventually sets in and we have to face the task of returning to the present.

    Try as we might, we just can’t click our heels together and wish change into being. It takes hard work and willpower to get things done.

  • Bringing history to life

    Taylor Burr learned a great deal about the Declaration of Independence through a recent interactive project.

    Over the past several weeks, he and all the other fourth-graders at Erwin Elementary School worked on group assignments called “Bringing History to Life With Claymation.”

    The students studied the key people and events surrounding the 18th century document in which the United States declared independence from Great Britain.

    The assignment, though, stretched far beyond reading the text book.

  • How about a career in pharmacy?

    Anik Vartanian’s parents have always chosen herbal treatment over medicine. Because of that preference, she’s long wanted to learn more about the effects of pills and other medications.

    Vartanian, a sophomore at the University of South at Lancaster, wants to become a pharmacist. She believes lectures like the one she attended Thursday are helping prepare her for that career.

    Ron Honeycutt, a pharmacist with Barnett-Honeycutt Pharmacy in Lancaster, was the latest guest to speak as part of a lecture series sponsored by USCL’s Chemistry Club.

  • Piedmont captures IL tournament

    Piedmont High School of Union County, N.C., went 5-0 to capture the title in the eighth annual Indian Land Border Duals at Indian Land High School on Saturday.

    The Panthers, 23-0 entering the one-day tournament, defeated South Pointe High School of Rock Hill 41-32 to cap its 5-0 run.

    PHS defeated Sun Valley 43-29, Marvin Ridge 59-18, East Meck, 75-0 and Ardrey Kell 57-21 before posting the nine-point win over the Stallions in the title match.