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Today's News

  • Column: I pray Trump cuts the roots of evil – judges, bureaucrats

    The Oxford Dictionary’s 2016 Word of the Year is post-truth. It is an adjective “denoting circumstances in which objective facts are less influential in shaping public opinion than appeals to emotion and personal belief.”  Emotion and feeling are the source of facts today. So now you can have your truths, and I can have mine.
    The American bureaucracy is an example of post-truth because it has been poisoned with liberal false science, false news and personal beliefs. Universities are not teaching students to think, but what to think.

  • Column: Busy first few weeks in House

    Since I was elected to the vacant House District 45 seat, the last few weeks have been busy ones, both for myself as well as the General Assembly and the state as a whole.
    This is the first of many updates I will be providing about what’s going on at the State House, as well as what I’m doing to represent the people of this region.

  • Column: Leaning on divine guidance

    God desires to lead and direct his people. He told David, "I will instruct thee and teach thee in the way which thou shalt go: I will guide thee with mine eye" (Psalm 32:8).

  • Agency helps seniors determine SNAP eligibility

    From release

    The Catawba Area Agency on Aging will use a recent grant to help seniors struggling to buy groceries apply for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) to stretch their food budgets.
    The program, part of a National Council on Aging  nationwide effort, addresses the millions of Americans 65 and over who face a double whammy: fixed incomes and rising food costs.

  • Rural roads must be made safer, DOT secretary says

    From release

    S.C. Transportation Secretary Christy Hall has proposed spending at least $50 million a year to reduce the high death toll on South Carolina’s roads.
    Hall made her presentation last month at a meeting of the S.C. Department of Transportation Commission in Columbia. Hall told the commissioners that improving safety on roads in the rural areas of the state should be the top priority for any new funding.

  • Kershaw puts $99K more into industrial park

    KERSHAW – The town of Kershaw is investing another $99,000 to help develop an industrial park in the southern part of the county.
    Town council unanimously voted Jan. 23 to pay the engineering firm Carlisle Associates to design plans for the site, which is just north of the town limits along Railroad Avenue and the start of North Matson Street.
    The money is coming from the town’s dedicated economic development fund.

  • Schools plan to hire next superintendent by mid-April

    Lancaster County School District officials have laid out the process and timeline for hiring the next school superintendent, and they hope to pick the new person by mid-April.
    Dr. Gene Moore announced last month that he will retire July 31.
    “We need someone to come in and take it by the reins,” said board Chairman Bobby Parker. “Our school district is going to attract a number of applicants. We are looking at a good future.”

  • Woman extracted from SUV

    HEATH SPRINGS – Rescuers scrambled for 20 minutes early Wednesday to extract a Kershaw woman from her crushed SUV after it slammed into a tree on New Hope Road, and she was later charged with driving under the influence.
    Ashley Nicole Fort, 33, was rushed to Springs Memorial Hospital, then transferred to another medical facility for treatment, said a hospital spokeswoman. Fort’s condition was unknown at press time.

  • House panel OKs increasing gas tax

    COLUMBIA – A bill that raises the state’s 16-cents-per-gallon gas tax to 26 cents over five years passed the House Ways and Means Committee on Thursday and is now headed to the House floor.
    If passed, the gas-tax hike, along with several other proposed fees, eventually would generate an additional $600 million a year to address the state’s deteriorated roads and bridges.

  • New details in high-profile murder cases

    New details emerged Thursday in some of the area’s highest-profile murder cases, as suspects appeared at  bond hearings in Lancaster County General Sessions Court.
    Appearing before Circuit Judge Casey Manning were Na’Chon Jakeh Hayden and Chris Jawan Glass, two of the four defendants in the April 2016 drug robbery and murder of 20-year-old Randy Tran in Indian Land.
    Also appearing in court was Arkevous Jimon Cauthen, charged in the May 2016 killings of Sandra Johnson and John Harden Duncan in Heath Springs.