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Today's News

  • Column: Leatherman rules if Trump picks Haley, McMaster

    What happens if Gov. Nikki Haley leaves office before the end of her term? What if Lt. Gov. Henry McMaster also does? Who would be governor then?
    Those questions have been raised over the past few days along with speculation about posts in the Trump administration – and some insiders are getting them wrong.

  • Column: Booing, lecturing VP-elect Pence was rude, vain and sanctimonious

    I have said that I cherish free speech, but I also cherish civility and was disturbed by what happened to Vice President-elect Mike Pence when he went to the theater Friday night.
    Mr. Pence went to see the Broadway musical “Hamilton” and was greeted with boos and then subjected to comments from one of the actors. Some have said the actor was very polite as he called out Mr. Pence in a public setting, but I felt his comments were sanctimonious, delivered in a tone of condescending sarcasm.

  • Wild hogs 'ecological zombies,' cause $115M damage across S.C.

    Scott Miller
    Clemson University

  • Lancaster man tweeted child porn, charges say

    A Lancaster man has been charged with using Twitter to distribute child pornography and faces a potential 20-year prison term.
    Richard Allen Kampen, 56, of 604 N. Woodland Drive, was arrested Nov. 18 following an investigation by the S.C. attorney general’s office and the Lancaster County Sheriff’s Offices as part of the Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force (ICAC).  
    Kampen is charged with two counts of sexual exploitation of a minor, a felony offense punishable by up to 10 years in prison on each count.

  • Town that loves trees is in for a shock

    KERSHAW – If the removal of a handful of 100-year-old oaks on North Matson and East Marion streets caused a near revolt earlier this year, Kershaw best get ready for all-out war.
    Mayor Mark Dorman told members of Kershaw Town Council on Monday night that soon scores of trees will be coming down. And just as with the other two incidents, it can’t be helped.
    Dorman said trees along Church Street must be cut down to run a 12-inch water line that will link Haile Gold Mine to the town’s water system.

  • Editor's Column: My 1st encounter with Linda Blackmon

    Let me start by making this clear: I have no opinion about the truthfulness of Jackie Harris’ voter-fraud allegations against Linda Blackmon after the Nov. 8 Lancaster City Council election. There aren’t enough facts on the table yet.
    With that out of the way, let me tell you a peculiar story.
    If you were driving past The Lancaster News parking lot on White Street late Wednesday afternoon, that was me in the white button-down shirt with my arms crossed, listening and looking perplexed.

  • IL residents ‘experience literacy in a fun way’

    Indian Land High School hosted its second-annual Family Literacy Night on Friday, bringing out nearly 500 local residents for a book fair, food truck and the Lancaster County mobile library.

    ILHS’s gym was full of booths displaying student projects, literacy games and reading strategies.

  • Images of what $199M buys

    Eight months after passing a $199 million school bond referendum, Lancaster County residents can finally see the big-ticket construction projects that the bond money will pay for.

    At Tuesday’s school board meeting, officials unveiled detailed digital images, site plans and building floor plans for the new Indian Land High School and an additional elementary school there.

  • Outdoor burning banned in S.C.

    South Carolina declared a statewide burning ban Saturday, citing the drought and an approaching cold front with gusting winds and low humidity, perfect conditions for fires to get out of control.

    State Forester Gene Kodama announced the ban at 6 a.m. and said it would last until further notice. This expanded a ban already in effect in 19 of the Palmetto State’s 46 counties. Lancaster had not been part of that earlier order.

  • New UDO limits most signs to 10 feet tall

    The signs, they are a changin’. 

    Or they will be if the proposed Unified Development Ordinance passes its third and final reading at the next county council meeting Nov. 28.

    The new UDO, which is finally almost finished after 20 months of reworking, limits most freestanding business signs to 10 feet in height and 40 square feet in area. It’s an effort to reduce visual clutter along the county’s roads.