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Today's News

  • Heath Springs votes to change majority elections to plurality

    HEATH SPRINGS – To avoid the cost of runoff elections, the county’s smallest town is moving toward holding majority elections rather than the current plurality-based system.

    Town council voted unanimously Tuesday night to make the switch. Council will consider the final reading of the plurality-voting ordinance at its December meeting. 

  • Christmas basket fund sets target at $10,000

    HOPE in Lancaster is kicking off its annual Ward Faulkenberry Sr. Christmas Basket Fund today and will collect items and monetary donations through December.

    Former American Legion Post 31 Commander Ward Faulkenberry Sr. founded the Christmas basket drive in 1959. HOPE began leading the fundraiser in 2008, after the Red Cross chapter that was heading it moved out of Lancaster County.

  • New IL postal site just west of Lowes

    The U.S. Postal Service, which ditched its first idea for locating the new Indian Land post office after an outcry from nearby residents, is rolling out another suggestion.

    The new site is near the intersection of U.S. 521 and S.C. 160 on a parcel immediately west of Lowes Home Improvement, said USPS real estate specialist Kurtis Bullard.

    “We want to let everybody know we’ve listened to their concerns,” Bullard said. “I think this location is going to be much better.”

  • Aaaaaand, they're off!

    Tammy and Mitch Boone were inside Home Depot on S.C. 9 Bypass by 6:15 a.m. on Black Friday – their usual first stop on the biggest shopping day of the year. 

    They dodged the shoppers perusing all sorts of DIY-related savings and headed straight for the poinsettias. 

    “There was a line, but we didn’t have to wait long,” said Tammy Boone, looking over a rack of apparel at Tractor Supply later in the morning. 

  • County per-capita income up 6.5%

    Propelled entirely by high-dollar Indian Land jobs, Lancaster County’s per-capita income jumped 6.5 percent in the past year, continuing the eye-popping growth that has totaled 79 percent since 2011. 

    But that indicator of prosperity actually creates an economic-development obstacle in lower-wage parts of the county such as Kershaw and Heath Springs, officials say.

  • Column: Don’t let 1 high-return year obscure need for pension fix

    The Public Employee Benefit Authority – the agency responsible for administering the state’s retirement plans – recently released its annual report assessing the South Carolina Retirement System (SCRS).
    In a huge upswing from previous years, the state’s pension investments performed very well during fiscal 2016-17, returning a rate of 11.88 percent on investment.

  • Column: Democratic policies hurt the country’s middle class

    Bobby Collins’ column in the Nov. 15 paper said some things that I need to respond to.
    But first, Mr. Collins, thank you for riding on the Democrat truck in the Lancaster Veterans Day parade in support of veterans. I was out of town and could not be with my veteran friends.

  • Clemson claws to top in school food drives

    Bekah Clawson and Jan Blainey might be the only two people in Lancaster without a favorite team Saturday when Clemson and USC square off for annual bragging rights in the Palmetto Bowl.
    Both of them are already on the winning side, thanks to football-themed food drives that benefited HOPE in Lancaster, as well as the food bank at Indian Land’s Belair United Methodist Church.
    Food collected the past two weeks at Buford Middle and High schools is already on the shelves at HOPE, said Clawson, the nonprofit’s executive director.

  • 7-hour standoff ends with no arrests, injuries

    Law enforcement officers swarmed the Northwest Apartments off West Meeting Street overnight Tuesday during a seven-hour standoff that ended with no charges.
    Lancaster County Sheriff’s Office spokesman Doug Barfield said the incident began about 9:45 p.m. when a deputy responded to the apartment concerning a report of shots fired.

  • Court dismisses S.C. education suit

    The S.C. Supreme Court has reversed its 2014 order that the legislature address the poor quality of education in rural school districts across the state, ending a 24-year legal battle over the issue.
    The 3-2 ruling Nov. 17 dismissed the lawsuit Abbeville School District v. the State of South Carolina. The 2014 ruling was criticized at the time as judicial intrusion into the General Assembly’s and governor’s responsibilities, and the high court, with two new members since the earlier decision, took that side this month.