Today's News

  • Neal named new executive director of KARE

    Kare Area Resource Exchange
    KERSHAW – Angie Neal has been named executive director of the Kershaw Area Resource Exchange (KARE).
    The board of directors was unanimous in selecting Neal, who has served as interim director since January 2015.
    Neal joined KARE in January 2013 as an administrative coordinator and assistant director during the illness of  the late Donna Hartley McKitterick, former executive director.

  • Come have fun at Indian Land Fall Festival

    INDIAN LAND – It doesn’t feel like fall without the Indian Land Fall Festival, now celebrating 10 years as the largest Panhandle event of the year.
    The Saturday, Sept. 19, festival, sponsored by the Indian Land Rotary Club and held at the Inspiration Ministries/CrossRidge, formerly known as the City of Light, will feature a car show, chili cook-off, live entertainment and a kids’ play area from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. In past years, the festival has drawn more than 10,000 visitors.

  • Lancaster firefighter quits to stay chief

    INDIAN LAND – Indian Land Volunteer Fire Department Chief Joe Pezzuti has resigned his position as a paid Lancaster County firefighter at the department for a full-time position as a lieutenant with the Fort Mill Fire Department.
    One of five full-time firefighters at the department who work for Lancaster County Fire Rescue, but are paid by Indian Land Fire Protection District fees, Pezzuti will retain his position with the department as volunteer fire chief, a position he’s held since January 2014.

  • ‘Cuts close to the heart’

    Holding his homemade sign high above his head, with the words “No blank check for McClancy” scrawled in big block letters, BridgeMill resident David Bradbard, along with hundreds of his fellow neighbors, hoped to make a firm point to Lancaster County Council on Monday night, Sept. 14.

  • School choice solution not the problem

    The Charleston Post and Courier recently published a five-part series, “Left Behind: The unintended consequences of school choice, in which readers are led to believe that the hardships experienced by some students at a North Charleston high school are the effects of school choice policies.

  • Ordinary people, extraordinary things

    Heroes are ordinary people.
    “They just do extraordinary things,” said Buford Middle School Principal Sarah Deason.
    On Friday morning, Sept. 11, students at BMS paused to remember the 2,977 people from 93 countries who died in the terrorist attacks 14 years ago that shook this nation to its core.
    It’s hard to forget what a group of terrorists hellbent on destruction did that day.

  • Creating the 21st century leader

    Can a new leadership and empowerment program help develop Lancaster County’s students into 21st century leaders?
    Dr. Linda Blackwell and Dean Faile think so.
    Blackwell, director of elementary education for the Lancaster County School District, and Faile, president and CEO of the Lancaster County Chamber of Commerce, presented an implementation plan for a program they are partnering on called ‘The Leader in Me’ during Lancaster County School Board’s Aug. 18 meeting.

  • Storm huffs and puffs, blows the bays down

    A thunderstorm that rolled over the area Thursday afternoon, Sept. 10, caused scattered damage across central and southeastern portions of the county.  
    The thunderstorm passed through Lancaster County roughly between 5 and 6 p.m., fierce with roiling clouds, lightening and rain, and then disappeared almost as quickly as it appeared.

  • TLN files FOIA letters to county, city, LCEDC officials

    Weeks after county officials dissolved the county’s years-long relationship with the Lancaster County Economic Development Corp., rumors continue to swirl and questions still remain about the events leading up to the fateful decision.

  • City needs to make upgrades at wastewater treatment plant

    Treating sewage isn’t glamorous by any stretch of the imagination, but it does carry a Park Avenue price tag, as members of Lancaster City Council learned at their Tuesday, Sept. 8, meeting.
    Council got its first in-depth look at two wastewater treatment plant studies by WK Dickson Community Infrastructure Consultants that were commissioned in March.
    As the 30-plus-minute detailed presentation spelled out, these upgrades aren’t going to be cheap, said Jimmy Holland of WK Dickson.