Today's News

  • Train Hard, Eat Healthy

    In honor of our veterans today, I am going to share with you a military-style workout so you can get in great shape and get a taste of a soldier's routine.
    This will give you a small idea of how hard they work for us.  I have been around many veterans in my day, and what I notice about most is no matter whether they are active duty, reserve or retired, they have adopted the habit of still being early birds. Many scientific studies have shown that rising early has lots of health and fitness benefits.

  • Guest Column: Veterans are all around us
  • Guest Column: Honor your own heroes on Veterans Day

    On the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month in 1918, World War I came to an end and the Armistice with Germany went into effect. From this day forward, Nov, 11 was known as Armistice Day.

  • 'In these 3 days I have lived a lifetime'

    Charles M. Blackwelder’s family found the small tin box in his Indian Land home after the World War II Marine veteran died last March.
    It contained a photo of a Japanese soldier, two books printed in Japanese and a small journal. Each item was stamped “EXAMINED IN THE FIELD – PASSED BY JOINT INTELLIGENCE.”
    The journal’s first seven pages were written in Japanese, but the next 13 were in English with the heading “Dear Diary.”

  • ‘The Strong One’

    KERSHAW – Some military heroes coach youth ball teams, are church ushers and even bag groceries, with few outside their immediate families ever aware of their actions.
    That’s especially true of Vietnam-era veterans who just don’t talk about their service, while their military records remain relatively unknown.
    When it comes to talking about Vietnam, Robert Brasington was like many of his fellow servicemen.

  • LCSO asks for help catching Walmart shoplifters

    The Lancaster County Sheriff’s Office is asking for the public’s help in finding a couple with a child who shoplifted several items from Walmart in Indian Land on Oct. 9 and stole the tag from a woman’s SUV.
    According to a release, sheriff’s deputies responded to a call from a woman who said she went shopping at the superstore about 3:20 p.m. and returned about 40 minutes later to find the license plate on her Ford Expedition had been stolen.

  • LACH out to dispel myths on homelessness

    The woman walking along Springdale Road that motorists pass by may not seem out of place, but she may not have a home to go home to.
    “It happens every day and most of the time we don’t give it a second thought,” said Melanie Outlaw, chairwoman of the Lancaster Area Coalition for the Homeless (LACH). “We see them walking down the street every day and most of the time, no one knows they’re homeless.”

  • Thieves steal $102K in equipment

    Thieves broke into a Lancaster County Parks and Recreation storage building at the city of Lancaster’s 15th Street complex last weekend and stole a pickup truck and other items worth an estimated $102,000.
    The burglary at 942 15th St. happened between 11 p.m. Friday and 6 a.m. Saturday, the Lancaster Police Department incident report said.
    According to the report, the thieves broke through the back wall of the building, breaking a water line in the process and causing extensive water damage inside the building.

  • Kershaw hires Boyes as town administrator

    KERSHAW – Town employees are learning that Joe Boyes likes to learn from the ground up, which is why sanitation workers may have been caught a little by surprise early Monday, Nov. 9.
    Boyes, 30, the new town administrator, showed up for work a little before midnight, Sunday, Nov. 8, to introduce himself as they were getting ready to start that day’s residential trash pick-up.

  • Council denies IL industrial rezoning

    Plummeting property values were not even on Howard Kance’s radar when he moved into his home in the BridgeMill neighborhood a few years ago, though it was his main concern as he sat in Lancaster County Council’s chambers Monday night, Nov. 9.
    Joining more than 100 of his neighbors, some spilling out the doors and all clad in red shirts, Kance hoped to urge council members not to approve a proposed industrial rezoning for McClancy Seasoning, an established spice business located directly next to his Indian Land neighborhood, just off U.S. 521.