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Today's News

  • Moore’s plenty dependable

    KERSHAW – Andrew Jackson head football coach C.J. Frye, pushed to the brink, can find only one problem with Volunteers’ senior defensive back Tay Moore.
    “We need more players like him,” Frye said. “If we could clone him, that might be an option, but we will take what we have. Tay is a high-caliber kid.”
    Frye, the Vols’ second-year head coach, can reel off a bunch of adjectives to describe the 5-10, 160-pounder, but said Moore’s dependability ranks as his highest asset.

  • Jackets’ diamond ace Sullivan signs to play at Limestone

    Limestone College softball is getting a diamond ace out of the Buford High School softball program.
    BHS Lady Jackets ace hurler Sydney Sullivan, who guided Buford to the 2016 Class AA state softball championship, solidified her verbal commitment signing with the Saints after giving them an oral pledge last fall.
    “I love the atmosphere at Limestone,” said Sullivan, who signed with the Saints on Nov. 10. “The school isn’t huge, but it is not small. It is what I was looking for in a college.

  • Column: S.C. chair Harrison raises hand for national Democratic position

    Since last week’s election, I have been thinking about my grandfather. His education topped out at fourth grade, and he spent most of his life paving the roads and highways in South Carolina.
    He was diagnosed with diabetes, and his experience with doctors made a bad situation worse. He told me that the worst part of his experience was that the doctors made him feel like he didn’t matter – a constant refrain throughout his life.

  • Column: Leaders must pursue peace as fervently as they fought

    The presidential election is over, and the world has not come to an end. But still there are those who are going through the weeping and gashing of teeth phase, so let’s try to see things in a larger perspective.
    We are a nation of different people. Some are open minded and calm, others are narrow minded and emotional. Some see the truth even when they don’t want to and others see only what they wish to see. Some accept reality with joy or sadness while others plant their feet, hold their breath and deny anything that is not the way they want it to be.

  • 800 barbecue plates at $8 each, ‘overwhelming’ support for Hall

    Wednesday’s barbecue fundraiser for police Lt. Phillip Hall sold out in less than two hours.
    Hall’s friends, co-workers and church family sold more than 800 barbecue plates at $8 each at Camp Creek Baptist Church, which Hall’s family attends. That doesn’t count multiple donations or those who said “keep the change.”

  • UDO a step away from final OK

    The Unified Development Ordinance crawled through 60 minutes of motions before passing its second reading on a 5-1 vote at the County Council meeting Monday night.
    The single no vote was cast by Councilman Jack Estridge. Council member Charlene McGriff was absent.
    “We are transitioning from a UDO that we know and are comfortable with to one that we can live with for 30 to 40 years,” said council Chair Bob Bundy.

  • Dressing up the old library on Gay Street
  • Rep. Norrell in New Zealand during big quake, aftershocks

    New Zealand is about as far from Lancaster as one can get on the planet, but when a major earthquake struck the Pacific nation this week, Mandy Powers Norrell was there on a legislative trip.
    The S.C. House District 44 representative from Lancaster was visiting Sunday morning when a 7.8-magnitude earthquake rocked the country. She was on her third trip overseas with the American Council of Young Political Leaders exchange program.

  • Pulte rejects county’s offer on Sun City roads, drains

    Sun City Carolina Lakes’ developer has rejected Lancaster County’s demand that it secure a $3 million line of credit to handle storm-drain repairs before the county will take responsibility for all of the development’s roads.
    In a Nov. 15 letter, Atlanta-based Pulte Group contends that under its 2005 development agreement, the county is clearly responsible for both the roads and the storm-water system at the massive Indian Land project.
    The letter gives the county 10 days to accept the company’s position or face legal action.

  • Reluctant assassin: Pay up or I’ll kill you

    An angst-ridden assassin e-mailed Bill Ardrey of Lancaster last week with a proposition.
    I’ve been hired to kill you, says the hitman, who identifies himself as Ofra Vaizman. But I really don’t want to, and if you pay me enough to leave the country, you can live.
    “I work for my boss Edwardo Sanchez of Hoalim Clan who’s a drug trafficker… and he has assigned me to kill you…. I cannot continue ANYMORE. I cannot kill ANY more lives because this is NOT the kind of life I’ve chosen to live.”