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Today's News

  • Storm halts racing action again

    Rain dominated for a second straight week as racing action at Lancaster Super Speedway was washed out.
    The LSS hot laps for the June 4 action were about to get rolling when the rain picked up and forced the LSS staff to cancel the racing night.
    Racing action returns, with the future cast for the weather looking much better.
    Fans and drivers with rain-out tickets from the May 28 race will need to bring their tickets/arm bands from that race for free admission Saturday night.
    The admission prices are $25 for the pits and $12 for the grandstands.

  • Piranhas' swim home opener Thursday

    The Lancaster Piranhas dropped a close loss to the Fort Mill Sharks in the LCST’s practice meet for the new Metrolina Swim League on June 2.
    Fort Mill took a 312-302 win over Lancaster.
    The Piranhas were led by Isabella Thorpe, Taylor Teague, Makenzy Mills, Alaina Houghtaling and Samuel Page with three wins each.
    Double winners included Bristol Glenn, Ryder Lucas and Charlee Brooke Henry.

  • Mingo recalls Ali’s impact

    A chance meeting with Muhammad Ali stands as an extraordinary moment in the life of Lancaster boxing champion Cedric “Mean Man” Mingo.
    Mingo, on the brink of a stellar professional boxing career in the late 1980s, which later landed him a coveted spot in the Carolinas Boxing Hall of Fame, recalled a memorable meeting with Ali in 1989.
    Ali, a three-time world heavyweight champion and one of the most celebrated sports figures of all time, died Friday in Scottsdale, Ariz.

  • Remember When: D-Day glued a young boy to the radio

    I enjoy dragging out old situations just so folks nowadays don’t forget. On June 6th, 1951, half of the male graduating class piled on buses to enlist in the armed forces.  America had another war going on.
    That was a big thing for young men my age, but nothing compared to America’s best-kept secret of 1944.
    During the early hours of Tuesday, June 6, 1944, Allied forces stormed the beaches of France. The military invasion of Europe had begun. World War II’s D-Day arrived in a hail of bullets and bombs.

  • Column: Sorting out what’s true, what’s spin not so easy

    Someone asked why I hadn’t written anything lately, and I said that my last article was not published because the editor felt I needed more verifications of my sources.
    At first it bothered me, and I felt he doubted my integrity. But after consideration I realized he was right to doubt because, as I told the editor, “there is so much information available from numerous sources that I often consider something factual if it has multiple sources in agreement,” but in today’s world of TV, radio, print media and Internet, that is not always true.

  • Column: Fred Sheheen was an S.C. institution

    We were shocked and saddened to hear about the passing of Fred Sheheen today. Fred was a South Carolina institution who devoted his life to lifting up all of us.
    As a young journalist, his reports on the Civil Rights Movement told stories of injustice that helped spur a nation to act. He played his own part in the long march toward justice as an aide to Gov. Donald Russell, during whose tenure our state took fitful yet peaceful steps toward desegregation.

  • Lightning suspected in house fire

    Lancaster County fire officials believe lightening may have caused a house fire east of Lancaster Saturday evening that displaced a family of four.
    The fire was one of two local house fires that day,  including one on Country Club Drive that slightly injured a resident.
    Lancaster County Fire Marshal Stephen Blackwelder said the most damaging of the two fires happened at 330 Holiday Road, where firefighters were dispatched during a thunderstorm about 9:57 p.m.

  • Mapping the monarch’s migration

    Colette Degarady found a glimpse of heaven on Earth last Christmas in the Sierra Madre Mountains of rural Mexico.
    A senior ecologist with the S.C. Nature Conservancy, Degarady ventured to the central Mexican highlands to observe a monarch butterfly cluster in winter.
    “It was incredible and almost like it was snowing butterflies,” she said. “Some people would lie on the ground and just take it all in. It was almost a spiritual experience.”

  • Fred Sheheen’s legacy of public service

    Nobody loved South Carolina more than Fred Sheheen, state Sen. Greg Gregory said Tuesday.
    Fred Sheheen, 79, died in a two-car wreck Monday near Lake Wateree in Kershaw County, said Kershaw County Coroner Phil McLeod.
    Fred Sheheen is the father of S.C. Sen. Vincent Sheheen (D-27). Vincent Sheheen and Gregory (R-16) represent Lancaster County in the state General Assembly.

  • Avondale ups incentives to county

    The Avondale development in Indian Land will be back on the table at the Juen 13 county council meeting, five months after council members killed the project in the face of neighbors’ protests.
    Council member Charlene McGriff made a request after the executive session at the May 23 council meeting for a motion to rescind the council’s rezoning denial for the Avondale Planned Development.
    Council discussed ongoing contractual negotiations between the county and Charlotte-based developer Sinacori Builders during the executive session.