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Today's News

  • Sports Talk: Harding High had special football season

    One of the top regional stories during the past high school football season was the rise of the Harding University High School (Charlotte, N.C.) Rams’ football team.

    In case you didn’t know, the Rams won the N.C. Class AAAA state championship last month, taking a 30-22 win over Scotland County, N.C., at Wake Forest University’s BBT Field in Winston-Salem, N.C.

    If Harding High rings a bell among county football fans, it’s not a stunner.

  • County wrestlers back on mat

    Lancaster County high school wrestling teams are looking to gear up for the second half of the 2017-18 mat campaign.

    Lancaster and Andrew Jackson were slated to return to action Wednesday night, but the matches were cancelled due to the forecast of winter weather and possible hazardous road conditions.

    The Bruins’ Region III-AAAA match with Westwood High School of Blythewood has been reset for Jan. 17 at Westwood.

    The contest will be a quad match, featuring region foes Richland Northeast, Ridge View, Lancaster and host Westwood.

  • Vincent earns FCA honor

    CHARLOTTE – Buford High School senior linebacker Noah Vincent racked up his share of tackles during the Jackets’ 2017 football season, and now he’s raking in the postseason awards.

    Vincent, a two-way starter for the Jackets, earned a prestigious regional award last week in Charlotte.

    Vincent was named the Fellowship of Christian Athletes Competitor of the Year for the Charlotte, N.C., metro region, some 15 schools.

  • SCDOT maps out 2 options for sidewalks near IL schools

    S.C. Department of Transportation has completed a study on cost of adding sidewalks around Indian Land middle and high schools, and now it’s the Lancaster County School District’s job to come up with the money if it wants them.
    School district safety director Bryan Vaughn said if the district decides to go through with putting in sidewalks, construction probably wouldn’t start for at least a year.

  • Chief Grant eager to get more boots on the ground this year

    Lancaster Police Chief Scott Grant has one goal in the upcoming months – getting rid of his department’s long-running manpower shortage.
    “It’s not easy to be a Lancaster police officer. These guys work,” Grant said. “It’s a hard job, and we ask a lot of our folks. We’ve been asking double that because we’ve been working short.” 
    At one time the department had 14 vacancies among its ranks of 39 sworn officers.

  • Protecting old cemetery from vandals to be costly

    Repairing the tombstones vandalized this week at Lancaster’s Olde Presbyterian Church won’t cost as much as initially feared, but needed security improvements at the historic landmark will carry a much heftier price tag.
    Vandals pushed over or broke 23 headstones at the cemetery on West Gay Street on New Year’s Eve. Thirteen grave markers were damaged there in a similar incident in August 2016.

  • ‘Kind of impossible’

    If you were lucky this week, your only exposure to the excruciating temperatures was a series of coat-hugging sprints between a car and a warm building.
    Tiffany Mingo was not so fortunate.
    She is one of the 33 mail carriers working out of the Lancaster Post Office on North Main Street. They’ve battled day after day of sub-freezing temperatures and whipping winds to complete their appointed rounds as swiftly as possible.

  • A bizarre, terrifying sequence of events ends well

    Shatoya Walker was headed to the grocery on Christmas Eve when a phone call from a stranger started the most terrifying 45 minutes of her life.
    Walker, 33, said the man called her by name and asked if she was married to Mark Roston. No, she said, that’s my father.
    “Is everything OK?” Walker asked, instantly alarmed.
    Your father was driving this morning, said the man on the phone. He hit a pedestrian – my 9-year-old cousin Hector. He’s in the hospital.

  • Column: Let’s give the children in our lives what they need this year

    What are you planning to change in 2018?
    This is a question we are all asked each New Year. I have been looking back at responses I received from students while I was teaching K4 and K5 in the late ’90s.
    Let me share some examples, exactly as written by the students, with their own thoughts and their own style of language at ages 4 and 5. These wonderful children were good writers for their age.
    ◆ 5-year-old girl: “I wants to cook My mommy wrks lot an bonly sambich get well they get yuck.”

  • Column: IL long-timer: County council has sold us out

    I am writing in reference to several letters that I have read over the past months concerning the proposed town of Indian Land.
    Just to give some background, my family is originally from Indian Land (150 or so years), and my parents moved down to Lancaster when I was a small child. My husband and I moved back to Indian Land 27 years ago so that our children could attend a small community school and we could build a home on the original family land. I have many fond memories of Lancaster and Indian Land.