.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Steven Puckett named principal of Panhandle’s new elementary

    Steven Puckett, who got his first principal’s job when Harrisburg Elementary opened three years ago, will do a repeat performance at Lancaster County’s next new school – the Panhandle elementary that will open in fall 2018.
    The Lancaster County school board voted 6-0 Tuesday night to make Puckett principal of the new facility, which doesn’t yet have a name. He will start the job Jan. 3.

  • Native American activist Dr. Will Goins dies at 57

    Dr. Will Goins, who had just begun an artist-in-residence program at USC Lancaster’s Native American Studies Center, died Sunday in Columbia after a heart attack. He was 57.
    Goins was a well-known and outspoken social activist, artist, writer, singer-songwriter and performer. He had been in Columbia attending the Native American Film Festival, which he founded there 20 years ago.
    “He wanted to speak for all of the unspoken people who didn’t think they had voices,” said Elsie Goins, his mother. “He was that voice for many people….

  • ‘Nutcracker’ features more than 100 local kids dancing

    Looking for a way to kick-start the holiday season?
    Each year, locals gather at Lancaster High School to watch a professional performance of “The Nutcracker” ballet that includes more than 100 local children.
    This year’s performance is 7 p.m. next Monday in the high school auditorium, 617 Normandy Road.
    Columbia City Ballet dancer Carmie Schiano Nelson says “The Nutcracker” has always been a holiday tradition for her, and she hopes to spread that tradition to anyone who sees the performance.

  • Camp Creek Road bridge to be replaced

    The S.C. Department of Transportation intends to close the aging two-lane Camp Creek Road bridge over Gills Creek in 2020 and replace it with a new one.

    SCDOT officials have scheduled a drop-in style informational public meeting from 5 to 7 p.m. Tuesday at South Middle School to unveil their $2.8 million plan.

    While construction is two years away, those impacted motorists will have to find alternative routes once it starts.  

  • Saluting our community’s vets

    Indian Land High School honored area veterans Friday during its annual Veterans Day breakfast and ceremony.
    This year’s event paid tribute to 75 local servicemen and women representing all five branches of the armed services and most every war and armed conflict back to World War II.
    Representing the latter was former Navy WAVE Dollie Steele of Indian Land, one of Lancaster County’s few remaining World War II veterans.

  • Tears for the classmate who didn’t come home

    If you want to know what it means to be a hero, talk to Vietnam vet Edward Harris.
    Harris, 69, will quickly tell you he isn’t one of them, though the former Army sergeant has a Bronze Star and a pair of Purple Hearts from the year he served as a 9th Infantry M-60 machine gunner in Vietnam’s Mekong Delta.
    “I’m not a hero, no sir, not me…. When I hear people call us heroes, to be honest, it’s always bothered me. I did what I had to survive,” said the father of two and grandfather of four.

  • A celebration, a solemn remembrance in Buford

    A crisp autumn breeze bit at any exposed skin and kicked up fallen leaves under a clear blue sky, the perfect backdrop for Old Glory and the multiple service branch flags fluttering Friday at the Buford Battleground Monument.
    People gathered, exchanging handshakes, laughs and smiles as they celebrated and remembered the nation’s veterans.

  • Hectic 2 years for Mayor Dorman

    KERSHAW – Midway through his first term as mayor, Mark Dorman has seen his share of day-to-day headaches.
    Town Administrator Joe Boyes resigned under pressure in February 2016 after only 16 weeks on the job.
    The municipal golf course, poorly maintained and losing customers, needed big upgrades. And the old Springs Industries Kershaw Plant was an abandoned hulk.

  • Homeless journey takes men to place of refuge, rebuilding

    Chris Smith’s bout with homelessness began when he was evicted from a mobile home he was renting.
    He lived in a tent for a while, moving it around among various state parks. He finally made his way to the Carriage Inn in Lancaster.
    When he couldn’t pay to stay there any longer, he saw a newspaper article about this past June’s dedication of The Citadel House on Trestle Lane. He walked across town to the new men’s emergency home and asked for help.

  • Man charged after 6-hour standoff on Ruth Street

    Kayla Vaughn and Mark Manicone

    The Lancaster News

    After a six-hour armed standoff at a Ruth Street mobile home Thursday night, authorities tear-gassed the place and stormed in, finding the occupant hiding beneath the floor.

    The incident ended about 9 p.m. with the suspect arrested and no one hurt.

    The Lancaster County Sheriff’s Office identified the man as 30-year-old Michael Wayne Terry II. During the incident, Terry had a rifle and threatened to harm himself or others, according to sheriff’s spokesman Doug Barfield.