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Today's News

  • End of inmate labor will cost county plenty

    Lancaster County is about to lose its only access to low-cost inmate labor, and officials are scrambling to come up with a plan that will avoid hiring county employees to do the work at an annual cost of hundreds of thousands of dollars.
    “It’s going to be a hit,” said Lancaster County Council Chairman Steve Harper, noting the local impact of the November closing of the Catawba Pre-Release Center in Rock Hill.

  • State ethics procedure precise and secretive

    As one legal challenge involving the Lancaster City Council ends, another might pop up in its place.
    Tuesday night’s vote to approve a $6,750 payment to newly installed council member Linda Blackmon – a vote that she participated in – has raised issues under South Carolina’s ethics statute.

  • New wrinkle for Promise Neighborhood

    Lancaster Promise Neighborhood has knocked on the federal government’s door for the second time after not getting the answer it wanted last year, but this time it’s using a new approach.
    This year’s application requesting nearly $20 million in federal funding – up from last year’s $12 million request – was completed classifying the Clinton Elementary attendance zone as a rural area. Last year we competed in the general category.

  • Absentee voting has started in our 3 municipal elections

    Absentee voting for the upcoming nonpartisan Heath Springs, Kershaw and Van Wyck town council races is now open.
    Qualified voters may cast absentee ballots in person from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays at the county voter registration office on the lower level of the Lancaster County Administration Building, 101 N. Main St.
    To request an absentee paper ballot application by phone, call the voting office at (803) 285-2969.
    The Heath Springs and Kershaw town council elections are Nov. 7.

  • Solicitor drawing together nonprofits to help drug addicts repair their lives

    The new Sixth Circuit Adult Drug Court Program is partnering with the United Way of Lancaster County to coordinate a network of services to help defendants turn their lives around.
    As part of the effort, Sixth Circuit Solicitor Randy Newman is inviting all agencies interested in receiving program referrals to a network meeting and lunch at noon this Tuesday.
    The meeting will be in the Lancaster’s City Council chambers at City Hall, 216 S. Catawba St. Those interested in lunch are asked to RSVP by noon Monday to Ben Dunlap at ben.dunlap@scsolicitor6.org.

  • Catawba Riverkeeper releases smartphone app

    From release

  • Blackmon votes to give herself $6,750

    Newly installed Lancaster City Council member Linda Blackmon broke a 3-3 tie Tuesday night as the council granted her request for $6,750 in back pay, compensating her for the nine months when a legal challenge kept her from taking office.
    But her vote drew immediate scrutiny under South Carolina’s ethics statute, which says public officials must recuse themselves on any vote “that affects their own economic interests.”

  • Ex-Panther: Life is all about attitude, preparation, effort

    INDIAN LAND – Colin Cole knows the secret of NFL success.
    The former Carolina Panthers defensive tackle should.
    In a business where the average career lasts less than three seasons, Cole made a living taking on blockers and stuffing runs for 11 years.
    Cole revealed that secret to the Indian Land High School Warriors football team Tuesday night at Freebird’s Family Restaurant.

  • Opposition to Indian Land incorporation is mobilizing

    As Indian Land incorporation organizers pivot to a “vote yes” campaign after winning approval from a key legislative committee in Columbia last week, opponents are ramping up their efforts to persuade residents to “vote no” on the proposition.

  • More metal detectors at high schools

    After two high-profile safety incidents on campus, Lancaster County School District is ramping up security in schools, implementing more aggressive metal-detector screenings at all four county high schools.
    The district is tripling its number of walk-through detectors.
    In the past week, an Andrew Jackson High student was charged with bringing a loaded handgun to school, and a shooting threat was written on an Indian Land High bathroom wall.