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Today's News

  • Homeless shelter network looks for a few more churches

    Organizers wanting to start a homeless shelter network among area churches have their sights set on getting a few more churches to commit to move the project forward.

    “Basically, we’ve got all our paper work finished,” said organizer Bill Hutchinson. “We just need to get five more churches on board.”

    Organizers have completed the articles of incorporation and are expecting a tax-exempt charter for the Lancaster County branch of Family Promise, a shelter program whose aim would be to help homeless parents and their children.

  • Teen faces amputation to save her life

    PAGELAND – Hope.

    These are four letters Pam Gainey hangs onto.

    Next week, she’ll travel to Greenville, where surgeons will remove her right leg, hip and pelvis to save her life.

    Pam, 18, is fighting cancer.

    “Hope is all they’re giving us to depend on,” Pam said. “And, I believe in miracles.”

    As her family gathered for church Sunday, the mood inside their mobile home off Steen Road in Jefferson was tense – only Pam could break it with her brand of humor.

  • County Council OKs heelsplitter district

    Lancaster County Council gave second approval to regulations dealing with the Carolina heelsplitter, an endangered mussel, Monday.

    The measures passed without discussion. One more reading must pass for the regulations to take effect.

    The heelsplitter, protected under the federal Endangered Species Act, was discovered living in Six Mile Creek in Indian Land in March 2006, during engineering for a Wal-Mart Supercenter at the state line.

  • Feathered friends visit students at Discovery School

    A few feathered friends landed at Discovery School last week to give students a unique lesson about animal survival.

    Jaimie White, a wild wings educator with the Carolina Raptor Center in Charlotte, brought in five raptors, or birds of prey, on April 4. They included a hawk, a falcon and three different species of owl.

    There were plenty of “oohs” and “aahs” as White let each bird out of its cage. Raptors have sharp talons for grasping prey, and White held each bird with a heavy leather glove to protect her skin.

  • County to help fund road study

     

    The decision divided County Council, but Lancaster County is chipping in $75,000 for a study of the impact the Dave Lyle Boulevard extension could have on the area.

    Council’s vote was 4-3 to fund it, with Councilmen Jack Estridge, Bryan Vaughn and Wayne Kersey voting against it. York County will fund another $75,000 for the study.

    The Dave Lyle Boulevard extension has been talked about for years, but funding the road project has been an issue.

  • Vouchers take money away from public schools

    This is in response to Al Simpson's article "Mulvaney supports public education" in the March 23 edition of The Lancaster News.

    Unfortunately, Mr. Simpson, most of the public can see through your attempt to mask the issues. I was raised by a public school teacher who taught in the system for her entire life, and I served as a public school teacher for more than five years before becoming a lawyer.

  • The Lancaster News wins five LCNI awards

    The Lancaster News advertising staff won three awards and the newsroom won two awards in the Landmark Communication Newspaper Inc. annual advertising and editorial contest held last week in Louisville, Ky.

    The contest was judged by the staff of The Virginian Pilot, the flagship paper of  The Lancaster News’ parent company, Landmark Communications Newspapers Inc.

  • Boost to weight program

    KERSHAW - The Andrew Jackson High School Athletic Booster Club has made a strong commitment to the Volunteers' athletic program.

    The AJ Boosters have purchased $60,000 of weight equipment which will be used to help the Lancaster County Class AA school's athletes.

    "Our booster club is a group of tireless workers and their goal is to help in any way possible," AJ athletic director Dale Reeves said. "They felt this was where we needed help the most at this point."

    Reeves said the old equipment, in the neighborhood of 20 years old, needed replacing.

  • Drivers should not ignore traffic lights

    In the April 4 issue of The Lancaster News, the story about an 18-wheeler hit a car at the intersection of S.C. Bypass and Meeting Street/Camp Creek Road brought back scary, scary moments for me.

    Two weeks ago my 5-year-old granddaughter and I were only seconds from being hit by a loaded pulpwood truck.

    I was stopped at the stoplight coming from Camp Creek. While I was waiting for the light to turn green for my way, two loaded pulpwood trucks went by really fast.

  • Proposed dog ordinance not yet ready to be unleashed

    A second vote on a new animal control ordinance that applies mainly to dogs and cats was postponed Monday night, but the issue still raged on before County Council.

    A handful of residents showed up to express their opinions about the proposed ordinance, which reflects the majority recommendation of a committee selected by council to study the issues.