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Today's News

  • ‘This is awesome. It’s an honor’

    Fourteen warm and unique Quilts of Valor were presented to military veterans Friday at Lancaster Convalescent Center. The room, full of family and friends, echoed with excitement.
    The veterans sat in front, with fearlessness and courage still in their eyes.
    “It’s the best day of my life,” said Army veteran Robert Ryan, who received one of the handmade quilts.
    Springs Creative Open Hearts quilting group presented the quilts. Each quilt is personalized and comes with a pillowcase and certificate.

  • Column: Do we really need checklist for potty visits at preschool?

    My husband owns a small business, and from time to time I’ve heard him say, “You can’t take a pee anymore without a government permission slip.”
    Please excuse the slight vulgarity. I bring it up because, in my line of work, it’s almost literally true.

  • Column: S.C. loses extraordinary leader, public servant

    With his death Saturday at age 96, we reflect on the life of former S.C. Sen. John Drummond, who served our state and our nation well. 
    A native of Ninety Six, John Drummond was born in 1919 to a family of millworkers, like so many other S.C. families of that era. Called to serve our country in World War II, he was a pilot and paratrooper, acquiring the nickname “Ace” due to his flying prowess.

  • Voter ID, new technology make this election different

    Prepared voters and new technology should make voting in this year’s General Election Nov. 8 a more efficient process despite the expected lines characteristic of presidential elections.
    “The biggest change since the last presidential election is the voter ID law, which was passed in 2014,” said Lancaster County Elections Director Mary Ann Hudson.

  • Kershaw holding hearing on oak trees

    The town of Kershaw will hold a public hearing at 7 p.m. Thursday about the town council’s decision last month to cut down four 100-year-old oak trees at the intersection of North Matson and East Marion streets.
    Kershaw mayor Mark Dorman called the trees a sticky subject.
    “This is something town officials clearly see both sides of,” Dorman said. “We’re supposed to represent all our citizens, which is why we need their input before going forward.”

  • Car flips but man unhurt
  • Local civil rights pioneer Larry Dixon dies

    Lancaster civil rights leader Larry Darnell Dixon Jr., past president of the county NAACP, died Saturday after a long illness. He was 75.
    “Larry was one of my dearest friends,” said county council member Charlene McGriff, who partnered with Dixon on civil rights efforts for more than 30 years. “He loved his family, his church and the NAACP…. He was a pioneer in civil rights in Lancaster.”

  • Solicitor takes over collecting bad checks for businesses

    Collecting on bad checks has always been one of the unavoidable hassles of business ownership, and writing a bad check can result in a damaging criminal record.
    A program launched this week by the 6th Circuit Solicitor’s Office aims to eliminate both of those problems.
    Solicitor Randy Newman’s new Worthless Check Unit will now handle all communication with the check writer, collect the money, pay the business and collect a fee for all that work. Check writers who pay up will have no criminal record. Those who don’t will be prosecuted.

  • $1,500 reward in tombstone vandalism

    A $1,500 reward is being offered to anyone who can help authorities arrest and convict the vandals who damaged gravestones last month in the Olde Presbyterian Church cemetery on West Arch Street.
    The award is being jointly offered by the Lancaster County Society for Historical Preservation and Crime Stoppers. Crime Stoppers is offering a $1,000 reward and the historical society is offering $500.

  • Hermine jolts storm-trackers