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Today's News

  • Yellow Jackets take two from Rams

    BUFORD – It was a swarm sweep for the host Buford Yellow Jackets on Saturday night.

    The Jackets, in their first home hoops game of 2018, stung the Chesterfield Rams for a pair of Region IV-AA wins.

    The game was originally set for Friday, but moved to Saturday because Chesterfield was out of school Friday due to a late week winter storm.

    The Buford Lady Jackets launched the sweep, taking a 55-40 win over the Lady Rams.

    The nightcap was closer, with the Jackets taking a 60-54 win over CHS.

  • Rep. Newton runs for re-election

    First-term Republican Rep. Brandon Newton is running again for his District 45 seat in the S.C. House.
    “Even though it seems like only yesterday that I was sworn into office, it is time to begin looking toward June and November,” Newton said Monday.
    Newton was recently appointed to the Education and Public Works Committee and still serves on the Regulations and Administrative Procedures Committee.

  • Rescuers can’t save horse that fell through ice

    HEATH SPRINGS – First responders worked for nearly two hours Saturday but were unable to save a horse that wandered out onto a frozen pond on Cottage Road and fell through the ice.
    Mike Dazzo with Lancaster County EMS said the dispatch call originally went out as a fallen person, but when paramedic Tony Graham and his partner, Daniel Mahaffey, arrived on-scene, they immediately called for assistance from the fire department.

  • Christie preserving natural, cultural heritage of region

    The Katawba Valley Land Trust has named Dick Christie its new executive director.
    “I’ve only been here a week, but I’ve accomplished a little bit,” said Christie, who took the job at the local land conservancy Jan. 1 after the retirement of Barry Beasley. “I’ve got some pretty large shoes to fill.”

  • Haile mine gives 367 acre tract to KVLT

    KERSHAW – Haile Gold Mine’s owner has donated 367 acres along Flat Creek in eastern Lancaster County to the Katawba Valley Land Trust, adding to the thousands of acres the company has set aside for conservation.
    The tracts border S.C. 265 and Taxahaw Road, with a good deal of frontage along the creek.
    “We’re real excited about the properties,” said KVLT Executive Director Dick Christie. “It’s going to be land that’s protected through best management practices.”

  • Column: Prefiled bills include oddities

    The S.C. legislative session started Tuesday, and a common theme in our recent state governance is that much of the legislation that’s proposed would do more harm than good.
    Unfortunately, if recently prefiled legislation (bills filed in advance for the upcoming year) is any indication, 2018 will be more of the same.
    While some proposals seem well thought out, others simply lack all signs of common sense. Here is a quick rundown of some of the more ridiculous prefile bills from the House alone.

  • Column: Library adapts as your needs keep changing

    What is it that makes Lancaster unique? What are our identifiers? How can we incorporate those into your 21st century public library system?
    It’s all about the citizens who live here – every single one. A library is democracy in action. No one person’s needs supersede another’s.
    A new baby goes home from the hospital with a free board book from the library’s Born to Read program. A retiree can find a comfortable chair and enjoy The Charlotte Observer (print version) for free. Microfilm of The Lancaster News dates back to 1905.

  • Grandmother charged in 3-year-old’s death

    The grandmother of 3-year-old Lilly Schroeder was arrested Friday in connection with the toddler’s beating death last month.
    Tracy Helms Schroeder, 48, of Rock Hill, has been charged with unlawful neglect of a child.
    Schroeder signed an agreement Sept. 1 with the S.C. Department of Social Services to be Lilly’s primary caregiver, according to the arrest warrant.

  • Column: S.C. nonprofit bill hides how groups spend our tax money

    There is a wolf in sheep’s clothing working its way through our state legislature.
    The bill purports to be a transparency bill, but it is anything but. And it will hide how millions of taxpayer dollars are spent.
    The wording begins saying any nonprofit entity that “received more than one hundred dollars in public funds from a state agency or political subdivision in the previous calendar year or the current calendar year, must submit a quarterly expenditure report to the jurisdiction awarding the funds.”
    That sounds great.

  • Column: For 2018, let’s unite in our love for Lancaster County

    With the arrival of 2018, it’s time again for resolutions, changes and goals.
    Many of us celebrated New Year’s Eve with family and friends, attending parties or church services across Lancaster County. But aside from all the celebrating, it is important that we reflect on the year we’ve had here.