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Local News

  • S.C. 160 widening project delayed again

    The project to widen Indian Land’s S.C. 160, already more than a year and a half behind schedule, has been delayed again, with bidding set for November and construction expected to begin early next year, a S.C. Department of Transportation official said.
    In the meantime, SCDOT has set a tentative schedule for improvements at Indian Land’s most congested intersection, U.S. 521 and Marvin Road.
    S.C. 160 widening delayed

  • Chamber chair: delay hospitality tax rollout

    Kristen Blanchard, the Lancaster County Chamber of Commerce chair, asked county council Monday night to hold off on enacting the hospitality tax until it has a plan for how the money would be spent.
    Blanchard, who is also the vice president of external corporate affairs for Nutramax Laboratories, brought the chamber’s concerns to county council during the citizens’ comments portion of the meeting.

  • City tax bills dip in new budget

    Tax bills for property owners in the city of Lancaster are going down for fiscal 2016-17.
    After a public hearing and work session held last week, Tuesday night council unanimously approved second reading of the $33.5 million budget.
    The budget raises the property tax millage rate to 176.4 from 164.4 in the previous budget. The millage increase would result in a $48 increase on a home in the city limits valued at $100,000.

  • County OKs $49M budget

    Lancaster County Council unanimously approved the third reading of its $47.9 million 2016-17 budget Monday night after a minor tweak.
    That adjustment was an increase in expenditures of $28,823, a plus for employees in the solicitor’s, public defender's and soil and water conservation district office who will receive 3% raises, equal to those previously approved for state employees.

  • Charles Marshall, educator, dies at 83

    Dr. Charles Marshall, who spent his career educating Lancaster’s children and retired as superintendent of the Lancaster Area Schools in 1985, died Thursday morning. He was 83.
    “He was an icon in the school system in Lancaster when I was there,” said retired teacher Charlotte Shaw. “He was a very positive man.”

  • Business booms for Fourth of July

    Lighting a fuse, hearing the launch and seeing a shower of colorful sparks appeals to many Americans as they light fireworks to celebrate Independence Day. 

    And Lancaster County’s northern Panhandle, just over the state line, is a fireworks destination for many from North Carolina, where fireworks laws are stricter than South Carolina’s.

  • Chamber education breakfast focuses on connections

    Building a workforce pipeline

     

    The goal of the workforce pipeline is to ensure the skills needed in the workforce match the skills developed by schools. Skills acquisition begins in elementary education. Secondary and post-secondary education build on those skills and add new ones. Industry partners work with educators to build programs.
    By working together, educators and employers build Lancaster County’s future workforce.

     

  • Cuttino remembered for encouraging ministry

    BEAUFORT – Those acquainted with Dr. Robert Edward Cuttino called him “Bob.” But those who knew him well called him “Barnabas,” due to his encouraging disposition.

    The former minister of Lancaster’s First Baptist Church and religion teacher at the University of South Carolina Lancaster died Thursday at the age of 86. 

  • Primary runoff Tuesday

    All registered Lancaster County voters may vote in the Republican primary runoffs Tuesday.

    The June 28 runoffs, like the June 14 primaries, will be open elections to determine the GOP winners of the Lancaster County Council District 1 seat and county auditor’s post. 

  • ‘Working Revival’

    Fifty people from across the state, plus one from Alabama, took a week out of their summer vacation to work on local homes during Lancaster’s 13th annual Salkehatchie camp.

    The campers invested $230 each into building supplies, travel expenses and food to help renovate four Lancaster homes at no cost to their owners.