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Local News

  • Charles Marshall, educator, dies at 83

    Dr. Charles Marshall, who spent his career educating Lancaster’s children and retired as superintendent of the Lancaster Area Schools in 1985, died Thursday morning. He was 83.
    “He was an icon in the school system in Lancaster when I was there,” said retired teacher Charlotte Shaw. “He was a very positive man.”

  • Business booms for Fourth of July

    Lighting a fuse, hearing the launch and seeing a shower of colorful sparks appeals to many Americans as they light fireworks to celebrate Independence Day. 

    And Lancaster County’s northern Panhandle, just over the state line, is a fireworks destination for many from North Carolina, where fireworks laws are stricter than South Carolina’s.

  • Chamber education breakfast focuses on connections

    Building a workforce pipeline

     

    The goal of the workforce pipeline is to ensure the skills needed in the workforce match the skills developed by schools. Skills acquisition begins in elementary education. Secondary and post-secondary education build on those skills and add new ones. Industry partners work with educators to build programs.
    By working together, educators and employers build Lancaster County’s future workforce.

     

  • Cuttino remembered for encouraging ministry

    BEAUFORT – Those acquainted with Dr. Robert Edward Cuttino called him “Bob.” But those who knew him well called him “Barnabas,” due to his encouraging disposition.

    The former minister of Lancaster’s First Baptist Church and religion teacher at the University of South Carolina Lancaster died Thursday at the age of 86. 

  • Primary runoff Tuesday

    All registered Lancaster County voters may vote in the Republican primary runoffs Tuesday.

    The June 28 runoffs, like the June 14 primaries, will be open elections to determine the GOP winners of the Lancaster County Council District 1 seat and county auditor’s post. 

  • ‘Working Revival’

    Fifty people from across the state, plus one from Alabama, took a week out of their summer vacation to work on local homes during Lancaster’s 13th annual Salkehatchie camp.

    The campers invested $230 each into building supplies, travel expenses and food to help renovate four Lancaster homes at no cost to their owners. 

  • Ansley Park issues complicated

    If there has been one common refrain among Indian Land residents concerned with the effects of growth on their community it is this: Lancaster County officials allow developers to do what they want without regard for the community’s best interests.

    Recently, those concerns have revolved around Ansley Park, a 309-home residential project that is the latest attempt to develop a portion of an 11-year-old mixed-use planned development district between Henry Harris Road and U.S. 521.

  • Homeowners may get tax cut

    The city of Lancaster’s proposed $32.8 million 2016-17 budget will result in a lower tax bill for homeowners but a slight increase for landlords and commercial businesses.

  • Being there for Charlee and the rest of his clan

    Chucky Rivers and his 3-year-old daughter, Charlee, are having a blast.

    He’s pulling her around in a wagon, cracking jokes, being silly.

    It’s one of her favorite things these days.

    Rivers, a Lancaster educator, is a father who appreciates little moments like these.

    He’s happy because she’s happy. Nothing else matters in the moment.

  • Mom remembers Nija as fun-loving, shy

    You may know her son, Nija Tinsley Jr., for his tragic death, but Lakesha Montgomery will never forget all the joyous moments he brought to her life.

    Like his dance moves. “He knew all the dances,” Montgomery said. Or the big smile he’d make when he took selfies.

    At school, he was well-mannered and a little shy, but always smiling, according to Montgomery. Nija would have been a second grader at McDonald Green Elementary this year.