Local News

  • Nutramax to expand, create 125 new jobs

    Nutramax Laboratories has purchased the former U.S. Textile Corp. women’s hosiery plant off S.C. 903 and intends to move its warehousing operation to the site, a $15 million project that will create 125 new jobs.
    While a formal announcement won’t be made until January, Kristen Blanchard, vice president of external corporate affairs for Nutramax, informed Lancaster City Council about the company’s plans at its Tuesday, Nov. 10, meeting.

  • Emails reveal lawsuit, threat of another

    One day before Lancaster County Council defunded the Lancaster County Economic Development Corp., agency President Keith Tunnell accused county leaders and employees of saying he had used his position for improper financial gain.
    In an email to County Administrator Steve Willis and Council Chairman Bob Bundy on Aug. 9, Tunnell expressed concern that they and “others connected with county government” were alleging he had “profited personally” in exchange for promoting incentives for local companies, among them Haile Gold Mine.

  • LCSO asks for help catching Walmart shoplifters

    The Lancaster County Sheriff’s Office is asking for the public’s help in finding a couple with a child who shoplifted several items from Walmart in Indian Land on Oct. 9 and stole the tag from a woman’s SUV.
    According to a release, sheriff’s deputies responded to a call from a woman who said she went shopping at the superstore about 3:20 p.m. and returned about 40 minutes later to find the license plate on her Ford Expedition had been stolen.

  • LACH out to dispel myths on homelessness

    The woman walking along Springdale Road that motorists pass by may not seem out of place, but she may not have a home to go home to.
    “It happens every day and most of the time we don’t give it a second thought,” said Melanie Outlaw, chairwoman of the Lancaster Area Coalition for the Homeless (LACH). “We see them walking down the street every day and most of the time, no one knows they’re homeless.”

  • Thieves steal $102K in equipment

    Thieves broke into a Lancaster County Parks and Recreation storage building at the city of Lancaster’s 15th Street complex last weekend and stole a pickup truck and other items worth an estimated $102,000.
    The burglary at 942 15th St. happened between 11 p.m. Friday and 6 a.m. Saturday, the Lancaster Police Department incident report said.
    According to the report, the thieves broke through the back wall of the building, breaking a water line in the process and causing extensive water damage inside the building.

  • Kershaw hires Boyes as town administrator

    KERSHAW – Town employees are learning that Joe Boyes likes to learn from the ground up, which is why sanitation workers may have been caught a little by surprise early Monday, Nov. 9.
    Boyes, 30, the new town administrator, showed up for work a little before midnight, Sunday, Nov. 8, to introduce himself as they were getting ready to start that day’s residential trash pick-up.

  • Council denies IL industrial rezoning

    Plummeting property values were not even on Howard Kance’s radar when he moved into his home in the BridgeMill neighborhood a few years ago, though it was his main concern as he sat in Lancaster County Council’s chambers Monday night, Nov. 9.
    Joining more than 100 of his neighbors, some spilling out the doors and all clad in red shirts, Kance hoped to urge council members not to approve a proposed industrial rezoning for McClancy Seasoning, an established spice business located directly next to his Indian Land neighborhood, just off U.S. 521.

  • Why did the tide turn against the LCEDC?

    You inch past a serious wreck on the interstate. Cars and an 18-wheeler sit mangled and steaming. Medics scramble to help the wounded. People are yelling, some are crying.
    The troubling scene recedes in your rearview mirror as you rev back up to highway speed and wonder what happened. Was it a texting driver? Blown tire? Road rage? You’ll probably never know.
    The aftermath of the August collision between Lancaster County officials and the Lancaster County Economic Development Corp. has been similarly messy, troubling and hard to understand.

  • Barbara a true friend, a rock-solid colleague

    A couple of weeks back, I did some fall cleaning in my Lancaster News work area.
    I found plenty of past personal notes and cards, but what I ran across the most was Christmas cards from retiring editor Barbara Rutledge.
    Each was more than a simple Yule greeting. She expressed her thanks for my work over the previous year, as well as best wishes for my family during the Christmas season.
    Her simple words were extraordinary: “Time to focus on family and friends.”
    That was Barbara in a nutshell.

  • Baskins acquitted in Barnes murder

    A Lancaster jury found a Charlotte man not guilty Thursday in the 2012 murder of a Lancaster woman, but convicted him on a lesser weapon charge.
    Roger L. Baskins, 43, stood trial last week for the Feb. 9, 2012, murder of 47-year-old Cynthia Barnes, who was found dead insider her home at 717 E. Dunlap St.
    The circumstances surrounding the murder largely remained a mystery until Baskins’s trial, which revealed the brutality of the crime. She had been stabbed 25 times with a screwdriver and shot three times.