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Local News

  • Ride to benefit HOPE in Lancaster

    Area families in need will benefit from a local motorcycle event this weekend.

    Second Baptist Church in Lancaster is hosting its Benefit & Ride for HOPE in Lancaster fundraiser this Saturday beginning at 9 p.m.

    Proceeds will go to HOPE, a charitable organization that assists county residents with food, rent and utility bills.

    “Because of the economy, we felt this was the right thing to do,” organizer Glenn Totherow said about giving to HOPE.

  • Native, union official wants residents at Washington event

    Lancaster residents who’d like to participate in a march on Washington on Oct. 2 can catch the bus.

    The district office of the United Steel Workers in Charlotte is encouraging residents to get on the bus to march on Washington, D.C., as part of One Nation Working Together.

  • Old jail may be used for training

    Members of the Lancaster Fire Department may be able to use the old Lancaster jail as a venue to gain valuable training experience.

    Officials learned this summer that the historic jail, built in 1823, has suffered cracks in the ceiling caused by vibrations from nearby  road maintenance.

    County Council has since considered several options to address the problem.

    One idea is to have the city fire department repair the ceiling, which would satisfy the structural collapse portion of their ongoing training for USAR (urban search and rescue).

  • Crazy for cornhole

    Thwack!

    Thwack!

    Thwack!

    As country music blares from the speakers and salsa, tortilla chips and, yes, a few pitchers of beer circulate in the parking lot of La Maceta, there is also a competition involving slanted, wooden platforms and bean bags.

  • Indian Land fire chief: ‘We take care of our own’

    INDIAN LAND – It’s not the fires or emergency calls that Raymond Griffin remembers most, but the firefighters who have served by his side.

    Griffin, chief of the Indian Land Volunteer Fire Department, has seen his share of blazes, car accidents and rescue operations. But when he thinks back on his more than 30 years of service, it’s the faces of his family of firefighters he recalls most clearly.

    Walking through the lobby of the Indian Land fire station, Griffin scans a series of snapshots covering the walls. There’s a story behind each one.

  • HEATH SPRINGS – A father and son have been charged in connection with a fight that left one man with head injuries and one of the suspects with a gunshot wound last week.

    The Lancaster County Sheriff’s Office has charged Michael E. Hyatt, 60, of 668 Merle Lane, Heath Springs, and Aaron D. Hyatt, 32, of 6123 Lola Drive, Kershaw, with attempted murder.

    According to the sheriff's office, Kamil H. Nassrah, 59, of 1602 Rocky River Road, Lancaster, and Michael E. Hyatt got into an argument about 4 p.m. Thursday in the middle of Merle Lane.

  • Prescription drug 'take-back' event slated

    The Lancaster County Sheriff’s Office, in conjunction with the Drug Enforcement Administration, will participate in the nationwide prescription drug “take-back” initiative, with the goal of preventing pill abuse and theft.

    DEA will be collecting potentially dangerous, expired, unused and unwanted prescription drugs for destruction at sites nationwide on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

    The service is free and anonymous, with no questions asked.

    Sites for the take-back initiative in Lancaster County are:

  • Rich Hill had its first truck before its first station

    Ford Small and Dennis Kirk remember when the Rich Hill Volunteer Fire Department’s first engine arrived.

    “It came in the fall – we were picking cotton,” Kirk said.

    The fire department, established in 1965, borrowed $11,210 to buy the fire truck. The department was founded by men like Kirk and Small, the second chief. William Stogner was the first chief.

    “We just saw the need,” said Small, now 83. “We figured if we can’t save the house, well, you can still save the barn.”

  • Group hopes to organize literacy network here

    The Lancaster Area Literacy Cooperative commemorated International Literacy Day by inviting segments of the community to a soup and salad lunch Sept. 8 as a means of starting a network involving literacy providers, partners, supporters and others.

    Forty e-mail invitations were sent out and 18 people, including city of Lancaster officials, staff from the J. Marion Sims Foundation, private citizens, member agency heads, board members, school personnel and political hopefuls, attended.  

  • Hospice group pays tribute to their beloved therapy dog

    Super Webbie.

    Webbie in a hot dog costume. A Santa hat. A birthday hat. Pajamas.

    Employees of Hospice Care of South Carolina in Lancaster shared their favorite stories about Webster, a therapy dog, and looked at pictures of him in various costumes at a special lunch in his honor on Tuesday.

    But the Labrador/husky mix, affectionately known as Webbie, didn’t have his usual spot at the table.

    Webster died of kidney failure earlier this month. He was 10 ½ years old.