Local News

  • Now is the time

    Lancaster County school board members approved a timeline Tuesday, Sept. 22, for a proposed bond referendum to pay for capital projects at county schools.
    Action on the bond referendum during Tuesday night’s work session comes as the school district wraps up a decade’s worth of improvements at the district’s 22 schools and faces a growing need for more schools in Indian Land.
    Tuesday night’s unanimous vote set in motion a process Lancaster County School District officials hope will result in a public vote on the matter as early as spring.

  • Garris to share Catawba heritage with KVLT

    Beckee Garris is more than the visitor’s coordinator of the University of South Carolina Lancaster’s Native American Studies Center on Main Street.
    She’s one of the guardians of the Catawba Indian Nation’s heritage. And as such, she can share a wealth of experiences, history and knowledge in a personal way.
    That’s what she will be doing at 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 24, as part of the 2015 Katawba Valley Land Trust Speaker Series.

  • Duke makes $5,000 donation to Stevens Park

    KERSHAW – Several years ago, Rick Jiran, Duke Energy’s director of government and community relations, called the 18.6-acre Stevens Park a significant asset to the town of Kershaw.
    And his opinion hasn’t been dampened one bit.
    “It’s a beautiful park and you’ve taken it to a whole new level,” Jiran said Friday morning, Sept. 18, while touring the park with Beverly Timmons.

  • IL Rotary event puts ‘fun’ in local fundraiser

    INDIAN LAND – Indian Land was the place to be last weekend as the community gathered to celebrate a brilliantly sunny day of family fun and the coming of a new season at the Indian Land Rotary Fall Festival.
    Now in its 10th year, the festival drew about 11,000 people to CrossRidge, formerly the City of Light, for a festival that included live music, good food, vendors, children’s games, 5K and one-mile fun run/walks, a car show and the fifth annual chili cook-off.

  • Six Matson Street oak trees to come down

    KERSHAW – Peg Bryson knows that six of the 100-year-old-plus historic oak trees on Matson Street are coming down, including the two in front of her home to make room for a much-needed six-inch water line.
    But she doesn’t have to like it and she doesn’t
    Between what Bryson calls more of a recent “butchering” instead of a trimming by a power line tree crew and the news the trees must go, Bryson is heartbroken over the issue.
    “I understand it, but it’s making me sick,” she said.

  • Arrests made in Kershaw theft cases

    The Lancaster County Sheriff’s Office arrested two Lancaster men, one a convicted thief not long out of jail, and a pair of juveniles last week in separate larceny and burglary cases in Kershaw.
    The cases are two quick successes during what has been a particularly busy late summer rash of the crimes at homes and businesses across the county.  

  • Ruptured pipe cuts off water to Kershaw

    KERSHAW – Parts of Boantown were bone dry for several hours Thursday, Sept. 17, after a 10-inch water line leading into town ruptured.
    Town administrator Tony Starnes said town hall phones started ringing just after 3 p.m. Thursday with water customers reporting the issue.
    “Either we don’t have any water or any water pressure,” he said at the time. “Right now, we aren’t really sure.”
    The town gets its water from the Lancaster County Water and Sewer District (LCWSD).

  • ‘Dispel the gossip’

    With the Panhandle’s housing market in full swing and its schools rapidly filling to capacity, do Lancaster County school district officials have a plan in place to address issues such as overcrowding?
    That was just one of the questions on Pam Mulvaney’s mind as she and several other concerned Indian Land parents showed up en masse during Lancaster County School Board’s meeting Tuesday night, Sept. 15.

  • Municipal bodies, LCEDC respond to FOIA requests

    City, county and economic development officials have all acknowledged receiving a series of Freedom of Information Act requests filed by The Lancaster News on Sept. 9, though no records have yet to be released.

  • More street lights needed to keep walking students safe

    Local business owner Melissa Horton pokes a little fun at herself with the title of “self appointed crime watch president of Meeting Street.”
    But when it comes to keeping children safe, the owner of Unique Hair Design and Unique Hair Design The School said it’s no laughing matter.
    Horton has launched a one-woman campaign to shed a little more early morning light on the area near Clinton Elementary School. She wants to see some additional streetlights placed on East Meeting Street and near the school.