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Local News

  • County Council debates rezones

    After 30 years of living along Country Club Drive in Lancaster, Bob Hunter worried a newly proposed rezoning could damage his neighborhood.

    Hunter became concerned after hearing that a tract of land about 300 yards from where he lives could soon be turned into apartment buildings. He urged Lancaster County Council a few weeks ago not to approve the rezoning.

    “People who rent property do not take care of the property,” Hunter said. “When they move, they leave stuff around.”

  • Candidates begin to file for offices

    A number of candidates seeking to run for a variety of offices this year filed with the county’s political parties last week.

    Incumbent, Democratic Lancaster County Council members who filed last week are Charlene McGriff in District 2, Larry Honeycutt in District 4 and Jack Estridge in District 6. Sandy Estridge has also filed to continue as probate judge. She is also a Democrat.

  • Kershaw man shot to death Saturday

    KERSHAW – A Kershaw man was killed after an ongoing disagreement ended in a shooting on Saturday night, according to the Lancaster County Sheriff's Office.

    According to a sheriff's office press release, Quintal Nehemiah James, 28, of 6534 Palmetto Street, was shot several times at his home about 8:30 p.m. Saturday.

    Investigators said that Rodney Thompson, 41, of  215 Jason St., Kershaw, came to James’ house, according to the press release. When James opened his door, Thompson fired a pistol and shot several times. Thompson then fled the scene.

  • Friends of land trust plan cleanup of trail

    GREAT FALLS – Katawba Valley Land Trust has established a friends group.

    One of the first projects initiated by this new group is a cleanup at the Rocky Creek Trail in Great Falls.

    In 2009, the trail, which is open to the public, was designated as an Audubon Important Bird Area and one of the first official legs of the proposed Carolina Thread Trail.

    Activities are planned on April 24, starting with a guided nature walk along the trail and transitioning into a cleanup, filled with contests and prizes for those who collect the most trash.

  • Measure would make auditor’s, treasurer’s jobs appointed posts

    County Council is considering a measure that would change the form of government in the county from an administrator to a manager form of government.

    The proposed change comes as longtime County Treasurer Dick Rowell has decided he won’t run again after his term expires in 2012.

    The change in the form of government would have to be approved by voters in a referendum.

    Council will have to approve an ordinance to put the referendum on November’s ballot. The ordinance would require three readings to be approved.

  • Response to census here above state rate

    Local participation is high as residents have begun mailing back their Census 2010 forms.

    As of March 24, 22 percent of Lancaster County residents have responded to this year’s U.S. Census, according to the mail-participation rate on the U.S. Census Web site.

    Lancaster County rates were higher than several neighboring counties.

  • Groups to hold gun drive here

    The number of murders and other violent crimes involving guns has spurred local law officers and community members into action.

    A gun drive will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. April 3 at the Lancaster Municipal Justice Center, 405 E. Arch St.

    The event is a joint effort sponsored by Pleasant Grove Missionary Baptist Church, the Lancaster Alternative Policing Strategy (LAPS) and the Lancaster Police Department.

  • Upgrades under way at city’s wastewater plant

    Upgrades to the city of Lancaster’s wastewater- treatment plant are under way.

    City Council was updated at its March 9 meeting about the plans for the plant, which includes the installation of a chemical-feed system to address the phosphorous the plant discharges into the Catawba River. The system will also control the pH levels.

    The city is also converting the plant’s disinfection system from chlorine gas to a safer disinfectant.

  • Native American Studies Week starts Saturday

    There’s plenty opportunity in the next few days to get a healthy sample of Catawba Indian art and culture.

    The University of South Carolina at Lancaster is hosting its fifth annual Native American Studies Week, beginning Saturday with the Native American Festival at the Bradley Arts and Sciences Building.

    The festival will be similar to the Yap Ye Iswa (Day of the Catawba) Festival that was held at USCL in November 2007 and 2008.

  • Airport project to begin in April

    Construction crews will begin concrete runway work at the Lancaster County Airport next month.

    The project, which will replace the top portion of the asphalt runway with 7.5 inches of concrete, is intended to strengthen the aging runway and make conditions safer for airplanes.

    The first phase of the project will involve shaving off the surface of the 6,000-foot asphalt runway and then pouring concrete over the remaining asphalt.

    The runway’s concrete work will be done in six separate, narrow bands that extend from each end of the runway.