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Local News

  • System to make auto calls in missing person cases

    “Hello. This is an urgent message from the Lancaster County Sheriff’s Office. We are currently searching for a missing child in your area.”

    That’s the recorded message that could soon be sent to thousands of homes across the county using a call system developed by A Child is Missing, a Florida-based nonprofit organization.

    The Lancaster County Sheriff’s Office learned of A Child is Missing a couple months ago while refreshing their officers’ Amber Alert training, which involves rapid-response techniques in child-abduction cases.

  • Police seek teen in shooting

    The Lancaster Police Department has issued warrants for a man wanted in connection with a Friday shooting.

    MiQuavis Cunningham, 19, has been charged with assault and battery with intent to kill and possession of a pistol during the commission of a violent crime, Capt. Harlean Howard said.

    Officers responded to the emergency room of Springs Memorial Hospital about 6 p.m. Friday because a man came in with a gunshot wound, according to an incident report.

  • Teachers to take one day off with no pay

    Area teachers and principals will take unpaid time off to help offset this year’s state budget cuts.

    The Lancaster County school board voted unanimously Tuesday to furlough teachers one day and administrators two days.

    The measure should save the district more than $302,000 in the 2009-10 fiscal year, said district finance director Tony Walker.

  • Missing since 2006

    When Coley Patterson went for a walk on the afternoon of Oct. 13, 2006, he told his sister he’d be right back.

    But he wasn’t.

    He never returned.

    Now, more than three years after Patterson’s disappearance, there are lingering questions about what happened to Patterson.

    A top hat and one of his shoes were found during a search that followed Patterson’s disappearance.

  • Willis county’s Employee of Quarter

    Teresa Willis received a unique birthday gift this year.

    Willis, 41, a longtime employee at the Lancaster County Parks & Recreation Department, learned Feb. 5 that she had been named the county’s Employee of the Quarter. Making the day even better, it was also her birthday.

    “It was a nice little birthday present for me,” Willis said. “It’s just an honor to be selected. And this time I was up against several other people. It was a big honor.”

  • Marsh reflects on success, upbringing in Lancaster

    Eugene Marsh was spit on regularly and was called the N-word on a daily basis.

    Times were tough, to say the least, for Marsh, one of four black students who integrated Lancaster High School in 1965.

    That was when integration was voluntary, and Marsh said it was easy for him to tell he wasn’t wanted at Lancaster High.

    Marsh’s life started out as a foster child on East Dunlap Street in Lancaster. He graduated high school in 1967 in what he recalls as a segregated and racist town.

    Opportunities weren’t simply handed to him.

  • Mickles recall changes since 1940s

    KERSHAW – John “J.T.” and Mable Mickle have seen a lot of changes for black Americans in their lives.

    J.T., 87, served in the U.S. Army during World War II, while the military was still segregated and later became one of the first blacks to work in manufacturing with DuPont in Camden.

    Mable, 82, was a teacher who helped integrate a Kershaw school in the late 1960s.

    Both grew up in Kershaw, J.T. on the east side, and Mable on the west. The couple celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary on Dec. 2, 2009.

    World War II  veteran

  • Will address issue affect census count?

    As Lancaster County readies for the 2010 U.S. Census, many Indian Land residents are worried about how their responses will be counted.

    Ted Hoover, vice president of the Indian Land Action Council, has spoken to several Indian Land residents who are concerned their census data could be accidentally counted in York County, affecting Lancaster County’s chances for school funding, road improvements or extra representation at the county and state levels.

    Their fear stems from the confusion between who lives in Indian Land and who lives in neighboring Fort Mill.

  • Lancaster native gives $1M to Clemson center

    CLEMSON – Investments by Lancaster native C. Tycho Howle and an anonymous private sector partner, along with a state match, total $4 million to support an endowed chair position in the Cyber-Institute Center of Economic Excellence (CoEE) at Clemson University.

    Howle and the anonymous private sector partner each invested $1 million to support the research and infrastructure of the center, and that will be matched by the state.

  • Eight groups receive Sims grants

    Direct health services and health education are among the projects funded by the J. Marion Sims Foundation’s most recent grant awards.  

    Eight organizations in Lancaster and Chester counties are the recipients of grants totaling $292,469.