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Local News

  • Will address issue affect census count?

    As Lancaster County readies for the 2010 U.S. Census, many Indian Land residents are worried about how their responses will be counted.

    Ted Hoover, vice president of the Indian Land Action Council, has spoken to several Indian Land residents who are concerned their census data could be accidentally counted in York County, affecting Lancaster County’s chances for school funding, road improvements or extra representation at the county and state levels.

    Their fear stems from the confusion between who lives in Indian Land and who lives in neighboring Fort Mill.

  • Lancaster native gives $1M to Clemson center

    CLEMSON – Investments by Lancaster native C. Tycho Howle and an anonymous private sector partner, along with a state match, total $4 million to support an endowed chair position in the Cyber-Institute Center of Economic Excellence (CoEE) at Clemson University.

    Howle and the anonymous private sector partner each invested $1 million to support the research and infrastructure of the center, and that will be matched by the state.

  • Eight groups receive Sims grants

    Direct health services and health education are among the projects funded by the J. Marion Sims Foundation’s most recent grant awards.  

    Eight organizations in Lancaster and Chester counties are the recipients of grants totaling $292,469.

  • Mother lives with anger, sadness

    KERSHAW – Shedrick “Simp” Sowell was well-liked as a student at Andrew Jackson High School.

    He played football for the Volunteers and worked for Small’s Grocery in Kershaw, starting in high school and beyond. Many people in the small town knew him from the grocery store.

    He was considered very good looking, said his mother, Barbara Jackson, 61. He sang in church, and had a daughter, Kantara, who Jackson said he loved.

    Jackson cherishes a Mother’s Day card she received from Sowell years ago.

  • Council considers aligning terms of board, commission members

    County Council discussed two potential ordinances last week that could change the terms of office for the members of county boards and commissions.

    Council considered first drafts of ordinances that would align the terms of office of council appointees to county boards and commissions with the terms of office of the respective council members who appoint them.

  • Tommy Walker, a participant in the fight for racial equality

    Tommy L. Walker has been active in local, state and national politics for decades and has been a dedicated supporter of the Democratic Party.

    He has been an eyewitness to change and an advocate for racial equality.

    This biography highlights Walker’s accomplishments:

  • Ricky Foster's brother searches for answers, closure in'98 case

    It’s been a long 12 years for Willie Foster as he’s tried to piece together what happened to his brother, Ricky, on June 5, 1998.

    Willie Foster remembers working at Springs Industries when a coworker told him a body had been found on Brooklyn Avenue. He didn’t think much of it at first.

    But he knew his brother lived near the area, and they had not spoken in a few days, so he decided to call his grandmother in Heath Springs.

    That’s when he learned that someone from the Lancaster County Sheriff’s Office had already spoken to her.

  • City votes down Arrowood-area annexation

    A measure that would have brought four parcels of land into the Lancaster city limits failed Tuesday night.

    The majority of City Council members – four – voted against a measure that would have annexed property on the northeastern edge of the Arrowood community, near U.S. 521 behind the Burns Ford dealership, into the city.

    Council members Linda Blackmon-Brace, Tamara Green, Kenny Hood and Gonzie Mackey voted against it.

    Mayor Joe Shaw, Councilwoman Sara Eddins and Councilman John Howard favored the measure.

  • F.A. Clinton was only black man to serve county in state Senate

    Frederick Albert (F.B.) Clinton has been the only black man to serve Lancaster County in the state Senate.

    Born a slave on a plantation on March 1, 1834, Clinton was educated and learned how to run a plantation from the owner of the property, Irvin Clinton. After the Civil War, Clinton was given land from his former master and Clinton continued to amass property. He established himself as a community leader in the Cedar Creek Township.

  • Columbia man dies after motorcycle wreck in Lancaster County

    A Columbia man died one day after wrecking his motorcycle on S.C. 97 in Lancaster County.

    Elmer Virgil Branham, 50, was riding his 2003 Harley Davidson about 3:30 p.m. Sunday when he ran off the right side of the road and hit an embankment, according to the S.C. Highway Patrol.

    Branham was taken to KershawHealth center and then transferred to a Florence hospital, where he died Monday, said Lancaster County Coroner Mike Morris.  

    He died from internal injuries, Morris said.