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Local News

  • Police announce arrests in Anthony murder

    A Lancaster man and woman are behind bars in connection with the shooting death of a Kershaw man late last month.

    Ketta Tomaka Evans, 34, 715 St. Paul St., and David Jamarcus Stalk, 23, 415 E. Dunlap St., have each been charged with murder and attempted armed robbery.

    Authorities say the two are responsible for the death of Kevisis Anthony, who was reportedly shot Jan. 26 in the area of St. Paul and Pleasant Hill Streets. Anthony, 32, died two days later from his injuries.

  • No parking signs worry Feiner

    A battle over no parking signs inside a small Indian Land neighborhood made its way to Lancaster County Council last month.

    Panhandle resident Erwin Feiner, who lives along Largo Lane in the Arlington neighborhood, brought his concerns about such signs, and the legality of towing cars along county roads, to council’s Jan. 28 meeting.

  • South Main water line work to cost $11k more

    More changes are coming to the city of Lancaster’s ongoing Streetscape beautification project along South Main Street.

    At a special meeting Wednesday, Feb. 6, City Council voted 6-0 to approve a suggestion regarding an old water line and a driveway request from affected property owners.

    Councilwoman Tamara Green Garris was absent from the meeting.

  • Council approves IL firefighter grant

    Despite an administrative snafu, Lancaster County Council approved matching a federal grant for the

    Indian Land Volunteer Fire Department during its meeting late last month.

    Council voted 6-0 at its Jan. 28 meeting to approve a $2,000 local match to fund a new breathing air compressor for the fire department. Councilman Steve Harper was absent from the vote on a previously scheduled trip.

    The amount is 5 percent of the total grant, with $38,000 funded by the federal government.

  • 'The Black Garbo'

    In downtown Lancaster, across from the historic courthouse, is the county’s Wall of Fame – five large portraits painted on the brick wall of the old Kimbrell’s Furniture building.

    Somewhat at odds among the likes of President Andrew Jackson, groundbreaking gynecologist Dr. J. Marion Sims, WWI flying ace and textile giant Col. Elliott Springs and Apollo 16 astronaut Charles Duke, is the portrait of a young black lady in a white smock and red headscarf.

  • District releases new school plans

    Lancaster County school board members got a look at final plans for Indian Land’s new elementary school during their annual planning meeting Saturday, Feb. 2.

    Approved in 2011 and intended to serve students in Indian Land’s northern end, the new school will be at 10251 Harrisburg Road, across from the BridgeHampton neighborhood.

    With the new plans approved by the state, district officials said they’re now ready to move forward with the bidding process. School officials are aiming for a fall 2014 opening.

  • Council discusses peddlers, hawkers

    What’s the difference between a Girl Scout and a man selling vegetables on the side of a road?

    It sounds like the beginning of a corny joke, but it was actually one of many questions Lancaster County Council members lobbed at each other as they discussed the exact definition of peddlers and hawkers during their Jan. 28 meeting. 

  • DEW to reduce unemployment services in Chester

    The lines at the unemployment office in Lancaster are about to get a little longer.

    Starting Feb. 19, the S.C. Department of Employment and Workforce (SCDEW) is reducing the number of its statewide offices for employment services from 56 to 40.

    One of those offices is in neighboring Chester County. 

    That means those in Chester who need face-to-face help with unemployment benefits must drive farther and come to the office here, at 705 N. White St.

  • A celebration of sacrifice

    KERSHAW – The S.C. Highway Patrol has not forgotten the ultimate sacrifice of one of their own.

    Monday, Feb. 4, marked 74 years since Patrolman Walter T. Bell was killed in a head-on collision in the town of Kershaw.

    The Camden resident had been assigned to license-inspection duty in Lancaster County that day in 1939 – a Saturday – and was on his way home when he was instantly killed in an accident.

    He was 36 years old.

  • Bus driver claims intimidation by parent

    Tensions between a Lancaster County School District school bus driver and a student’s father led to accusations of intimidation against the father, but no charges.

    According to the Feb. 3, incident report, a bus driver dropping children off at a stop near Elm Street and Blue Lane called the Lancaster County School District bus depot to report a man “sitting on the sidewalk with a long gun across his lap.”