Local News

  • Council creates mining district

    Two years after the word “landfill” was etched into the minds of county residents, officials have created a new zoning district to help alleviate concerns about a rumored landfill site near Kershaw’s Haile Gold Mine.

    A new mining district designation received first approval, as did the rezoning of thousands of acres of gold mine property, during Lancaster County Council’s meeting on Monday, March 11.

  • Ready to give back

    The state Senate has confirmed Gov. Nikki Haley’s appointment of Glenn McFadden to the S.C. Department of Natural Resources Board.

    As a member of DNR’s policy-making body, McFadden will represent South Carolina’s 5th Congressional District, which includes Lancaster County. He will finish out the term of Randy Lowe of Hartsville, which ends in June 2014.

  • Siren sends warning throughout Great Falls

    GREAT FALLS – You may have heard a loud sound Tuesday, March 5, you haven't heard in many years...or you may never have heard it.

    That loud blast was emitted from a tornado warning system that’s now in place at the Great Falls Fire Department.

  • FL Fire Department to charge for wreck calls

    FORT LAWN – The Fort Lawn Fire Department will follow the lead of the Richburg and Lewis Departments by charging for responses to car wrecks.

    In recent months, the Richburg and Lewis Fire departments have taken advantage of a county ordinance that allows a charge to be assessed to a person’s insurance company if they are involved in a wreck that the department responds to.

  • Two tax sites now open


  • SMH receives award from American Heart Association

    Springs Memorial Hospital

    Springs Memorial Hospital has received the Get With The Guidelines–Stroke Silver Plus Quality Achievement Award from the American Heart Association.

    The award recognizes the hospital’s commitment and success to implement a higher standard of care by ensuring stroke patients receive treatment according to nationally accepted guidelines.

    This is the first year SMH has been recognized with a stroke-centered quality achievement award.

  • Three Lancaster women charged with shoplifting in York County

    A trio of Lancaster woman found themselves behind bars in York County after an investigation into almost $5,000 worth of items stolen from a Walmart in Tega Cay.

    Melissa Sue Meyers, 23, 3041 Crenson Drive, Sherniece Nichols Jones, 23, 3041 Crenson Drive, and Donna Faith Beckham, 38, 260 Wheat St., were all arrested Feb. 27, according to a York County Sheriff’s Office case report.

    Deputies were searching for a fourth woman, also from Lancaster, who they had issued warrants for, though the woman has not yet been arrested, the report said.

  • Small new LCPRC director

    The Lancaster County Parks and Recreation Commission has a familiar face as its deputy director.

    Katherine Small, a Lancaster native, began her duties as deputy director Feb. 11.

    “Katherine is going to do a real good job with us,” LCPRC Director Hal Hiott said. “She’s very energetic, outgoing and has good ideas for our programs. She will bring a fresh face to our operation.”

    Small, a 2004 Lancaster High School graduate, earned her undergraduate degree at the University of South Carolina in 2008.

  • Woman reports gunfire near horse stable

    Several mysterious gunshots and a wounded goose led an Indian Land woman to call authorities to her horse stable late last month.

    A sheriff’s deputy spoke with the woman along Henry Harris Road on Feb. 23, according to a Lancaster County Sheriff’s Office incident report.

    The woman reported she was standing in her field feeding horses when she heard gunshots. At first, she wasn’t worried because she’s heard gunfire in the area before, the report said.

  • LARS hits an IL bump in the road

    A smattering of Panhandle residents will be looking for alternate rides to their medical appointments now that a public county transportation system has hit a bump in the road, though county officials say the problem is only temporary.

    The problem, which will impact residents living in newly designated “urban clusters” sprinkled across at least three small areas in Indian Land, was discussed during a grant request presentation at Lancaster County Council’s Feb. 25 meeting.