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Local News

  • Kids the focus of July 4 celebration

    At a picnic table across from Jackie’s Place on Brooklyn Avenue on Saturday, Michael Jenkins sat with other children as they finished a hot dog lunch and dug into a juicy red watermelon.

    “Y’all make messes,” Jenkins, 10, said matter-of-factly to the girls sitting next to him. The girls – Amani Steward, 7, Shamora McFadden, 6, and Lamonisha Nelson, 13 – giggled.

  • Officials eye home detention

    A potential home detention program could soon ease the county’s jail overcrowding problem.

    County Council unanimously approved first reading of an ordinance Monday to create a home detention program.

    The ordinance would allow the sheriff’s office to create the program, which would use electronic monitoring devices to keep tabs on non-violent offenders, allowing them to serve time in their homes.

  • Process of elimination

    Budget shortfalls forced Lancaster County School District personnel to eliminate about 100 positions for 2010-11.

    But how do administrators determine which people lose their job?

    Lydia Quinn, the district’s director of planning and accountability, said a reduction-in-force policy is followed when the district has to make position cuts.

  • Healthy Woman Program adds online benefit

    Beginning Tuesday, the Healthy Woman program of Springs Memorial Hospital is moving to a new online platform.

    At www.healthywomanonline.com, new and existing members can register for upcoming events, read timely health articles, and exchange messages with like-minded Healthy Woman friends. Members will also have access to an award-winning online health library that includes 12,000 adult and pediatric topics in both English and Spanish.

  • Rare local history book resurfaces

    The Lancaster County Historical Commission has rediscovered an out-of-print book about local history.

    The Rev. J.B. Knight, who has written books about Lancaster’s mill hill community and has an extensive collection of local history books, found “Historical Notes from Lancaster County, S.C.” in his collection in March and thought the county Historical Commission would be interested.

    The book was compiled Viola Caston Floyd, who wrote several books and pictorial histories of Lancaster County.

  • County a leader in census count

    Lancaster County is tied to lead the state in census participation.

    Both York and Lancaster counties had 79 percent of their residents respond to this year’s U.S. Census, according to the mail participation rate on the U.S. Census website. The rates far exceed both counties’ response rates from the 2000 Census, when Lancaster County had a 70 percent response and York County had a 72 percent response.

    Terry Plumb, spokesman with the Charlotte Regional Census Center, said both counties’ numbers were impressive.

  • County Council delays Glen Laurel decision

    INDIAN LAND – Glen Laurel residents have waited more than a year to see if the roads in their Indian Land neighborhood would be accepted into the county’s road system. Last week, they were told they’d have to wait another week.

    With a large group of Glen Laurel residents waiting anxiously in the audience, Charles Bradford, the York-based attorney representing the Glen Laurel homeowners association, addressed Lancaster County Council on June 28 about having the neighborhood’s roads incorporated into the county system.

  • Proposed PDD change nixed

    Joe Ramsey worried that a change in planned development districts could turn the county’s Panhandle into a cluster of shopping malls.

    Ramsey, an Indian Land resident, was one of several citizens to voice concerns at Lancaster County Council’s June 28 meeting about an ordinance which would have reduced the required acreage for future PDDs in the county from 150 acres to 50 acres.

    A PDD, such as Sun City Carolina Lakes in Indian Land, combines both residential and commercial properties.

  • Council to review improvement projects

    County Council will discuss a list of improvement projects at its Tuesday meeting that could help the county receive crucial funding.

    Council will review its annual priority capital improvement list, a list requested by the Catawba Regional Council of Governments that describes the top improvement projects a county would like to implement. The list is part of a planning process developed by the federal Economic Development Administration, used to create a plan called Comprehensive Economic Development Strategies.

  • $206,000 is estimate to repair jail

    County officials now know what it will cost to repair the old Lancaster County jail – almost $206,000.

    Jody Munnerlyn, the architect working on the restoration of the historic Lancaster County Courthouse, and Chad Catledge of Perception Builders, who is overseeing the construction of the new court facility, presented those numbers to council on Monday night.

    Munnerlyn said the repairs will cost $205,766. This amount includes environmental testing, removal of old materials, demolition and reconstruction of the roof, insulation and drywall.