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Local News

  • Three Lancaster women charged with shoplifting in York County

    A trio of Lancaster woman found themselves behind bars in York County after an investigation into almost $5,000 worth of items stolen from a Walmart in Tega Cay.

    Melissa Sue Meyers, 23, 3041 Crenson Drive, Sherniece Nichols Jones, 23, 3041 Crenson Drive, and Donna Faith Beckham, 38, 260 Wheat St., were all arrested Feb. 27, according to a York County Sheriff’s Office case report.

    Deputies were searching for a fourth woman, also from Lancaster, who they had issued warrants for, though the woman has not yet been arrested, the report said.

  • Small new LCPRC director

    The Lancaster County Parks and Recreation Commission has a familiar face as its deputy director.

    Katherine Small, a Lancaster native, began her duties as deputy director Feb. 11.

    “Katherine is going to do a real good job with us,” LCPRC Director Hal Hiott said. “She’s very energetic, outgoing and has good ideas for our programs. She will bring a fresh face to our operation.”

    Small, a 2004 Lancaster High School graduate, earned her undergraduate degree at the University of South Carolina in 2008.

  • Woman reports gunfire near horse stable

    Several mysterious gunshots and a wounded goose led an Indian Land woman to call authorities to her horse stable late last month.

    A sheriff’s deputy spoke with the woman along Henry Harris Road on Feb. 23, according to a Lancaster County Sheriff’s Office incident report.

    The woman reported she was standing in her field feeding horses when she heard gunshots. At first, she wasn’t worried because she’s heard gunfire in the area before, the report said.

  • LARS hits an IL bump in the road

    A smattering of Panhandle residents will be looking for alternate rides to their medical appointments now that a public county transportation system has hit a bump in the road, though county officials say the problem is only temporary.

    The problem, which will impact residents living in newly designated “urban clusters” sprinkled across at least three small areas in Indian Land, was discussed during a grant request presentation at Lancaster County Council’s Feb. 25 meeting.

  • Business leaders oppose city ordinance

    Might the city of Lancaster soon put businesspeople at risk for identity theft?

    Hugh Mobley, owner of Mobley Drugs, lists that as one of his concerns regarding a proposed ordinance that would change the way license fees are calculated for businesses within the city limits.

    On Feb. 26, City Council unanimously passed first reading of a measure to require businesses to submit portions of their income tax returns. Those state and federal forms would be used to determine how much businesses should pay for their respective city license fees.

  • Walter Craig, Jim Moreland made an impact that lasts

    Lancaster County’s historical and educational communities are mourning the loss of two influential residents, Walter Craig Sr. and James Moreland Sr., both from Kershaw. Those who knew the men say their impact on Lancaster County was significant and will live on for years to come.

    Walter Craig Sr.

    Walter Craig, 68, died March 2, at Hospice House in Rock Hill after a battle with leukemia.

  • ‘Her little blue eyes danced and danced’

    For Sarah Chilson-Cole, knowing is one thing.

    Just like the rest of her family, this mother of four has come to the sad realization that her niece, 5-year-old Soren Chilson, is tragically gone. She has to come to grips with that. 

  • Peddlers, pawnbrokers and poker machines

    At first glance, peddlers, pawnbrokers and poker machines don’t have much in common, though a recent county decision affects each in a unique way.

    Lancaster County Council voted unanimously on several ordinances during its Feb. 25 meeting to delete any licensing fee requirements for pawnbrokers, video poker machines and peddlers and hawkers from the county’s code.

  • Local United Way names Outlaw as new director

    Though her title is different, Melanie Outlaw says her role will remain the same.

    Outlaw, who’s worked for the United Way of Lancaster County since 2009, has been named the agency’s executive director. Her first official day in that position was March 1.

    Before last week, Outlaw’s title had been resource development coordinator. But because the local United Way office had no executive director, Outlaw assumed those duties as well.

  • Man sentenced for store burglaries

    A Lancaster man arrested last fall for a string of burglaries only three months after his release from prison was sentenced again last month.

    Dennis Michael Robertson, 45, 2720 Lynwood Drive, was sentenced Feb. 21 to 12 years in prison after he pleaded guilty to two counts of violent second-degree burglary, according to a press release from Sixth Circuit Solicitor Doug Barfield.

    He was sentenced by Circuit Court Judge Brooks P. Goldsmith.