.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • Black parents talk to kids about dealing with police

    In light of two recent shootings of black men by police, two Lancaster moms decided it was finally time to talk to their oldest children about the relationship between African-Americans and the police.

    "I never imagined that this would have to be a conversation – ever,” said Octavia “BJ” Harris, 33. “Never thought that I would be having to have these conversations with my 12- and 9-year-old boys.”

  • Alley clears lanes for last time

    The Lancaster Bowling Center (LBC) closed its doors for good Saturday night. The balls were racked and the gaudy shoes placed back on the shelf for the last time. 

    Owner/manager Freddie Robinson hung a sign on the front door Monday saying this was LBC's last week.

    "It's just time to retire," said Robinson. He also said the downturn in the economy played a part in the decision to close. 

  • Buford 3rd grade teacher spends summer learning sign language

    To bridge the gap between the hearing and deaf communities, Buford Elementary School third-grade teacher Mary Anna Wilkes is spending her summer learning American Sign Language.

    Wilkes’ interest in learning sign language started at her previous job with the Head Start program at Southside Elementary School 10 years ago, where she had the opportunity to work with young children who had hearing impairments. 

  • From mayor’s shirts to mayor’s quilt

    At Tuesday’s meeting of Lancaster City Council, Charlotte Shaw, widow of the city’s longest-serving mayor, was given a quilt made from his shirts bearing the city’s logo.

    Joe Shaw, who was mayor for 33 years, died last November.

    Several months ago, Charlotte Shaw brought several of his shirts by City Hall to be given to municipal employees, but city staff decided to have a quilt sewn for her, instead. 

  • Will deadly amoeba be killed before water reaches us?

    Almost a month after an Ohio teen died from a “brain-eating amoeba” found in the water at the U.S. National Whitewater Center, officials are still deciding how to dispose of that water. 

    The U.S. National Whitewater Center closed June 24, but it still contains12 million gallons of water in a big pool. 

  • Pokémania

    The mobile game that has swept the nation in the past two weeks is getting many young Lancaster residents off their couches and into the city to play.  

    It’s called Pokémon Go.

    The “augmented reality” app ties the virtual world of Pokémon to real-life landmarks around downtown Lancaster and across the country.

  • Trucks demolishing IL road

    Residents of Indian Land’s Legacy Park subdivision say heavy construction traffic from a neighboring development is destroying two of the community’s roads.

    Leslie Jamieson of Xandra Court has lived in the neighborhood for seven years and walks her dogs along Vance Baker Road twice a day.

    Jamieson said since July 5, a steady stream of dump-truck traffic in and out of a new development at the end of the road has caused severe cracking along the shoulder of Vance Baker.

  • John Newell, veteran of 3 wars, gets Quilt of Valor

    John Newell, 97, was presented with a Quilt of Valor in May by the Springs Creative Open Hearts quilting group at his home in Lancaster.  

    Newell was in the Army for 23 years, serving in three wars. He was an infantry corporal in World War II. After leaving the military, he re-enlisted during the Korean War and served as an infantry staff sergeant. During the Vietnam War, he served as staff sergeant in an artillery division.

  • Another scam to add to the list: mystery shopper

    Reece Murphy 

     “We have a mystery shopping assignment in your area and we would like you to participate,” the employment ad said. “Your wages would be $260 for any work you carry out and you can carry out two assignments in a week.”

  • 12 axles to pull the heavy load

    Brian Garner/Landmark News Services

    RICHBURG – There are a couple of new workers on the Lancaster & Chester Railway these days, but you might not recognize them. The new workers are a “mother-slug” combination.

    L&C retiree Ed Sharpe said a mother-slug is basically two engines joined together.