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Local News

  • Kershaw wants SCDOT to replace caution light with stoplight

    KERSHAW – The S.C. Department of Transportation may have rejected a 2014 request from town officials to replace the caution light at the intersection of East Marion and North Matson streets with a traffic signal, but that doesn’t mean the town is giving up on the matter. 

    Kershaw leaders talked with SCDOT officials Tuesday in hopes of getting a new traffic study there. 

  • Construction zone ahead

    Lancaster County School District board met Thursday morning to discuss the layout of the three facilities that will begin construction in March.

    Jimmy Wilhide of Moseley Architects presented three site and floor plans to the board for multipurpose buildings at Lancaster High School, Buford High School and between Andrew Jackson Middle and High schools.

  • Town hall meeting to address underage drinking

    The Coalition for Healthy Youth is sponsoring a town hall meeting for parents and their teens to come together with community leaders and experts to discuss underage drinking. 

    The event, Communities Talk: Town Hall to Prevent Underage Drinking, will be from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Wednesday in the special events room at the University of South Carolina Lancaster’s Bradley Building. 

  • Sunday alcohol sales petition cleared for ballot

    Besides voting for the county’s next president in November, Lancaster County voters will also help decide whether the county will allow Sunday beer and wine sales in stores.

    A petition to allow Sunday beer and wine sales in county stores was officially cleared this week to appear as a referendum on the Nov. 8 general election ballot.

    The Lancaster County Voter Registration and Elections Office received the petition July 6 with 7,014 signatures. 

  • Black parents talk to kids about dealing with police

    In light of two recent shootings of black men by police, two Lancaster moms decided it was finally time to talk to their oldest children about the relationship between African-Americans and the police.

    "I never imagined that this would have to be a conversation – ever,” said Octavia “BJ” Harris, 33. “Never thought that I would be having to have these conversations with my 12- and 9-year-old boys.”

  • Alley clears lanes for last time

    The Lancaster Bowling Center (LBC) closed its doors for good Saturday night. The balls were racked and the gaudy shoes placed back on the shelf for the last time. 

    Owner/manager Freddie Robinson hung a sign on the front door Monday saying this was LBC's last week.

    "It's just time to retire," said Robinson. He also said the downturn in the economy played a part in the decision to close. 

  • Buford 3rd grade teacher spends summer learning sign language

    To bridge the gap between the hearing and deaf communities, Buford Elementary School third-grade teacher Mary Anna Wilkes is spending her summer learning American Sign Language.

    Wilkes’ interest in learning sign language started at her previous job with the Head Start program at Southside Elementary School 10 years ago, where she had the opportunity to work with young children who had hearing impairments. 

  • From mayor’s shirts to mayor’s quilt

    At Tuesday’s meeting of Lancaster City Council, Charlotte Shaw, widow of the city’s longest-serving mayor, was given a quilt made from his shirts bearing the city’s logo.

    Joe Shaw, who was mayor for 33 years, died last November.

    Several months ago, Charlotte Shaw brought several of his shirts by City Hall to be given to municipal employees, but city staff decided to have a quilt sewn for her, instead. 

  • Will deadly amoeba be killed before water reaches us?

    Almost a month after an Ohio teen died from a “brain-eating amoeba” found in the water at the U.S. National Whitewater Center, officials are still deciding how to dispose of that water. 

    The U.S. National Whitewater Center closed June 24, but it still contains12 million gallons of water in a big pool. 

  • Pokémania

    The mobile game that has swept the nation in the past two weeks is getting many young Lancaster residents off their couches and into the city to play.  

    It’s called Pokémon Go.

    The “augmented reality” app ties the virtual world of Pokémon to real-life landmarks around downtown Lancaster and across the country.