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Local

  • Indian Land author signs 1st book

    Beverly Lane Lorenz
    For The Lancaster News

    Indian Land resident and first-time author Liz Gilmore Williams held a book-signing event at the Del Webb Library on May 6.  
    Her self-published book, “No Ordinary Soldier: My Father’s Two Wars,” blends creative nonfiction, history and memoir, Williams said.
    And it is no accident that she published her book on Dec. 7, 2016. That was the 75th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor.  

  • Elections officials prep for recount

    The recount of Tuesday’s 5th District GOP runoff, won by Ralph Norman by less than a percentage point over Tommy Pope, should begin about mid-morning today in each of the congressional district’s 11 counties.
    “As soon as the state election commission notifies us, we’ll get started,” said Lancaster County Elections Director Mary Ann Hudson.
    Chris Whitmire, S.C. Election Commission spokesman, said Thursday that a mandatory recount will almost surely be necessary after Tuesday’s unofficial vote totals are certified this morning.

  • Time for summer camps

    Our 2017 Arts and Sciences Camps are organized and ready to go for this summer.
    Thanks in large part to grants from the J. Marion Sims Foundation, the Duke Energy Foundation, the John T. Stevens Foundation and Wells Fargo, our camps focus on keeping children engaged in creative learning through courses they choose in the arts and sciences as well as providing a popular, fun summer arts experience.   
    Our goals are to:
    ◆ Offer an exceptional experience for each camper.

  • HOPE offers 2 new ways to get help

    HOPE in Lancaster has added two new programs – the Senior Food Program, designed to immediately help the elderly poor, and the Bounce Back Program, for anyone going through a financial struggle.

  • Panhandle to get 335 more jobs

    Fort Mill-based Unique Loom is expanding its operations to Indian Land, creating 245 new jobs there over the next four years, and moving an additional 90 positions from Fort Mill.
    The company, an online distributor of home furnishings products, has leased the vacant Defense Ventures building at 793 Fort Mill Highway, according to Jamie Gilbert, Lancaster County’s economic development director.

  • Wrecked scrap-metal hauler blocks bypass lanes 6 hours

    The two eastbound lanes of S.C. 9 Bypass at the North Main Street overpass were shut down for more than six hours Monday after a trailer loaded with scrap metal overturned.
    Sgt. Tim Witherspoon of the Lancaster Police Department identified the driver as Brian Dean Stamey of Dallas, N.C.
    The truck cab did not flip over, and Stamey was not hurt. He was walking around talking with police after the accident.
    Witherspoon said the wreck happened about 9:37 a.m. Monday. Stamey works for Kern’s Trucking of Kings Mountain, N.C.

  • S.C. 9 Bypass reopens after metal spill

    The eastbound lanes of S.C. 9 Bypass under the North Main Street overpass reopened to traffic about 4 p.m. Monday. The two lanes had been shut down for a little more than six hours after a trailer loaded with scrap metal overturned just after 9:30 a.m., strewing both eastbound lanes with shards of metal in all kinds, shapes and sizes.
    The truck cab did not flip over, and the driver was not hurt. For more, see the Wednesday, May 17 edition of The Lancaster News.

  • Metal truck tips, blocks S.C. 9 Bypass

    The two eastbound lanes of S.C. 9 Bypass at the North Main Street overpass are shut down after a trailer loaded with scrap metal overturned just after 9:30 a.m. Monday. The truck cab did not flip over, and the driver was not hurt. He was walking around talking with police.

    Firefighters, police and the S.C. Department of Transportation crews are all at the scene.

    Both eastbound lanes are strewn with metal, and the cleanup could take hours. 

  • Train Hard, Eat Healthy: Tweaking ‘bad’ foods to make them better for your body

    When I first started learning about being healthy, I was a bit overwhelmed. It seemed as if there was always a “bad” way of doing things and a “good” way.
    It was crazy! If you eat this way, it’s better. If you eat that way, you will die. At the local bookstore were shelves upon shelves of weight loss books, healthy recipe books and personal development books – all claiming to be the “right” way.

  • Why are honey bees dying in their hives?

    Tom Hallman
    Clemson University

    TRAVELERS REST – With every scoop of bees Brad Cavin pours gently into a cardboard box, he brings science one step closer to unraveling the riddle of honey bee decline.
    At an apiary near the foot of the Blue Ridge Mountains, Cavin gathered samples of honey bees – live ones, dead ones, their unborn brood and the pollen the bees collect – as he has from hives all across the Palmetto State this spring.