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Local

  • Shelter virus identified, plan may save dogs

    The mystery disease at the Lancaster County Animal Shelter has been identified as distemper, and there’s a plan in the works that might avoid euthanizing any of the 25 quarantined dogs on the premises.
    The shelter remains closed, and a team effort is under way to save the dogs. Shelter staff and volunteers are working with local veterinarians, the S.C. Humane Society, the Charleston County Animal Society, and the Lancaster Area Shelter Supporters (LASS) on a plan to permanently relocate the dogs. At this point, it has spots for 18 of the animals.

  • Lancaster man dies in Chester jail

    A Lancaster man, Charles Thomas Minors, was found dead in a cell at the Chester County Detention Center after being arrested for DUI on Sunday.

  • Flood watch issued for county

    Rainy weather in the upcoming days has prompted the National Weather Service in Columbia to issue a flash flood watch until Thursday morning for 18 of the state’s central counties including Lancaster.
    A flash flood watch means that conditions may develop that lead to flash flooding.
    Other counties in the watch area include Aiken, Bamberg, Barnwell, Calhoun, Chesterfield, Clarendon, Edgefield, Fairfield, Kershaw, Lee, Lexington, McCormick, Newberry, Orangeburg, Richland, Saluda, and Sumter.

  • Weekend Recap: May 23, 2017

    A Lancaster man, Charles Thomas Minors, was found dead in a cell at the Chester County Detention Center after being arrested for DUI on Sunday.

    According to an incident report from the Chester County Sheriff’s Office, he was brought to the detention center by the S.C. Highway Patrol at 5:40 p.m. Sunday. The report notes that the man was too intoxicated to be booked at that time and was put into a holding cell to sober up.

  • Honoring Buford’s fallen

    For years, Buford High School senior Catherine “Cat” Tofts has been reading about the history of Buford’s Massacre.
    Now the JROTC cadet has researched and written about one obscure aspect of it. Her essay on American Revolution soldier Charles Cuffey won a contest sponsored by the nonprofit Friends of Buford Massacre group.
    Cuffey is one of the 216 known soldiers whose names are etched on a bronze plaque that will be dedicated Saturday at the battleground during the annual wreath-laying ceremony.

  • Centennial honor for Builders Supply

    Saying big-business relocations to South Carolina too often hog all the attention, S.C. Secretary of State Mark Hammond came to Lancaster on Wednesday to toast a small business that has adapted and thrived for more than a century.

  • Rotting $115K playground at Stevens Park beyond repair

    KERSHAW – The closed Haile Gold Mine Playground at Stevens Park is beyond repair, and the rotting $115,000 wood structure will have to be demolished.
    Town council unanimously voted this week to spend $21,000 for a new scaled-down set of playground equipment for the park.
    “I think it’s an emergency situation, since the park is closed,” said Kershaw Town Administrator Mitch Lucas. “It’s summertime and school is going to be out.”

  • A much-loved 28-year-old begins his short goodbye

    Every Southern town has at least a handful of eccentrics – characters who keep the place interesting.
    Pierre Cunningham has spent his lifetime as one of ours. He lives in one of Lancaster’s last vintage mansions and runs his business there. He’s a masterful cake baker, an unbelievably obsessive dog owner, always animated, cheerful and over-the-top confident. He calls himself “the boss.”
    And we will lose him soon.

  • Foundation accepting applications for grants

    From release

    The Lancaster County Community Foundation is accepting applications from eligible Lancaster County nonprofit organizations, congregations, governmental and educational institutions for its 2017 grant cycle.
    In 2016, foundation awarded $4,500 in grants to local nonprofits, including HOPE in Lancaster, Grace Place in Lancaster, The Lancaster County Society for Historical Preservation and Palmetto Citizens Against Sexual Assault. The average grant size was $1,000.

  • Martial arts for autism awareness

    Ashley Lowrimore
    For The Lancaster News

    Free two-week karate classes offered at Kenaki Karate during National Autism Awareness Month received such a big response, the classes were expanded through the entire month of April.
    Held at Kenaki Karate’s four locations – Lancaster, Indian Land, Chester and Kershaw – Kenaki not only had full classes, but also experienced a record-breaking attendance day, with nearly 100 students simultaneously on the floor at the Lancaster location.