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Local

  • From street criminal to inspiring adult

    It’s Oct. 17, 1998, late night in Orangeburg, and 20-year-old Gary Robinson – aspiring musician, drug addict, homeless stickup kid – is sick of it all and wants to get out of South Carolina.
    Money first. A chance encounter with his boys at the One Stop.
    “We’re about to rob those guys up there,” his partner says, pointing out at a car across the parking lot.

  • A mother’s heart breaks

    One of La’Tisha Pearson’s last memories of her son Allen Cooper is from the night before his murder.
    The scary movie “Get Out” was playing in the living room at their home on Witherspoon Street east of downtown Lancaster. Pearson is no fan of scary things.
    Allen, a frequent prankster, saw his mom coming down the hall, and he hid just around the corner. As she passed, he jumped out to startle her.
    “You’re going to give me a heart attack,” Pearson told him, laughing.

  • GOP candidates’ signs removed on primary day

    INDIAN LAND – Evidently, someone in the Panhandle detests Republican candidates’ lawn signs.
    Between 11 p.m. Monday and 7 a.m. Tuesday when the polls opened for the in the 5th District congressional primaries, 80-plus lawn signs outside seven  polling places – Black Horse Run, Harrisburg, Osceola, Pleasant Valley, Possum Hollow and River Road, as well as a few at Kershaw South –  had been moved. Six of the precincts are in Indian Land.

  • Grieving parents come together to heal

    On the first Tuesday of every month, grieving parents gather to talk, listen and heal from the loss of their children.
    Janice Steele unexpectedly lost her 43-year-old daughter, Terri Ledbetter, two years ago this month. The loss devastated Steele, who wrestled daily with paralyzing pain.
    “Right before last Christmas, it just hit me that there were other people going through pain just like me, and I thought: ‘We can help each other,’” Steele said.
    In the meetings, parents talk freely about their children who have died.

  • Give Local pulls in $155K for 42 area nonprofits

    Give Local Lancaster raised $154,915 for 42 local nonprofits in its second-annual 24-hour online fundraiser, topping last year’s total by 64 percent.
    “That’s just under a quarter of a million dollars in the span of 12 or 13 months,” said an excited Robert Folks, board chair of the J. Marion Sims Foundation, which hosted the event.
    “This huge sum is injected into the nonprofit area from this event alone,” Folks said. “That to me sends a message that we can do many things in our community that we set our minds to.”

  • Kids' musician Roger Day holds free concert Saturday

    Lancaster County First Steps will host a free concert on Saturday featuring children’s musician Roger Day.
    The “Dream Big” concert is 10 a.m. at USC Lancaster’s Stevens Auditorium.
    “We are excited to bring Roger Day to Lancaster, and we want to fill every seat,” said Lora Bryson, executive director of Lancaster County First Steps. “Our organization wants to make sure that hope lives on in the families of Lancaster County.”

  • On Faith: No IDs, no income limits, just free food and God’s love

    Editor’s note: Debbie Gallien, who was probably born smiling, works the front desk at The Lancaster News. When she asks, “How can I help you?” she really means it.

    Christians are called by God to be his hands and feet. Romans 12:13 tells us: “When God’s people are in need, be ready to help them. Always be eager to practice hospitality.”

  • Give Local Lancaster races past its goal

    The second-annual Give Local Lancaster got off to a fast start Tuesday, and just two-thirds of the way through its 24 hours of giving it had already topped its goal of $94,000.  
    Susan DeVenney, president of the J. Marion Sims Foundation, said the online fundraising drive had received more than $63,000 in individual donations by 9 p.m.
    “We have also received $42,000 in corporate donations, so we will pass last year’s total of $93,810,” she said at mid-afternoon.

  • 'We have to keep fighting'

    Nearly 800 people attended Lancaster’s 22nd-annual Relay for Life event Friday night at Lancaster Memorial Stadium. They raised $35,000, pushing this year’s total to $126,000.  
    Event Chair Kellie Mosely said she is confident they will meet their $165,000 goal.
    “We had a really good turnout,” she said.
    The three top fundraising teams at press time were Relay Rally Cats at $16,000, Team Dustin Carnes at $15,241 and A.R. Rucker at $13,000.

  • Corey's day to shine

    Chances are you know at least one family member who is affected by autism. One in 88 children is diagnosed with autism each year in America.  
    I am the mom of a handsome 28-year-old  young man, Corey Pope, who lives with this complex condition. I have been involved in the world of autism for nearly a quarter century, and I still have a lot to learn.
    Living with Corey’s autism has brought me, my husband, Curt Sirk, and our daughter, Caylin, to a deep understanding of how his condition relates us all to God, family and friends.