.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local

  • Healing Horses heals her

    INDIAN LAND – Tucked away in the Black Horse Run neighborhood, on one acre of land, is a place where horses hurt on the outside get healed on the inside.

    Resident Katie Holme runs Healing Horses, a program for abused horses. Horses like Dakota Messenger, a Standardbred she recently found at an auction, come to Holme in bad shape, with cuts and wounds over their dingy coats, ribs and hip bones jutting out from starvation and the baggage of behavior problems that come from being mistreated.

  • Kershaw Town Hall torn down

    KERSHAW – Kershaw Town Hall came down Friday.

    Built about 1902, the complex on Hampton Street underwent various renovations and uses over the years. It was demolished by Maintenance Insulation of Lancaster to make way for a new town hall to be constructed next year on the same site.

    The demolition work started Nov. 13, with workers starting from the back and working toward the front, said Town Administrator Tony Starnes. The work will cost slightly more than $18,000.

  • 'Tis the season to shop, buy, sell

    The holiday season is a time for gathering and celebrating with friends and family, gift-giving, reflection and thanks. To commemorate this time of year, the U.S. Census Bureau presents the following holiday-related facts and figures from its data collection.

    Rush to the stores

    Retail sales by the nation's department stores in December 2006 was $31.4 billion. Sales represented a 44 percent jump from November 2006 (when retail sales, many holiday-related, registered $21.8 billion). No other month-to-month increase in department store sales last year was as large.

  • Blackmon achieved great success in construction business

    Longtime Lancaster home builder, land developer and entrepreneur Richard Blackmon, who died Friday at age 93, achieved great success, but he didn't put on airs of self-importance.

    Blackmon, instead, had an average Joe persona, said state Sen. Greg Gregory, who is also president of Builders Supply in Lancaster.

    Gregory's father, Bubber, and Blackmon were partners in the construction business. Together, they developed the Gregwood subdivision in Lancaster.

  • Groundbreaking for IL library set

    INDIAN LAND – The groundbreaking for the new Del Webb Library at Indian Land will take place at 3 p.m. Dec. 2.

    The new library, to be built as an anchor to the Carolina Commons shopping center, is scheduled for completion in November 2008.

    Members of the Lancaster County Council and the Lancaster County Library Board of Trustees will be present at the ceremony. Rudy Carter, Council chairman, David McDonald, principal of Indian Land Elementary/Middle School, and Trish Douglas, lifelong resident of Indian Land, will offer short remarks about this event.

  • Mother waits for justice

    Losing a son is tough and Maxine Stradford said it's also tough knowing that the person who's been charged in his death hasn't been tried yet.

    It's been more than a year since Maxine Stradford's son, Elandro, was shot and killed outside the Lancaster Creamery on Memorial Park Road.

    Elandro Stradford was walking along a pathway behind the creamery when he was confronted by Michael Jerome Funderburk on Nov. 11, 2006, according to the Lancaster County Sheriff's Office.

  • Birds and beavers and deer, oh my! And in the city, too

    Lancaster has gone to the birds, the beavers and the deer.

    A Woodland Drive woman recently worried that beavers in the creek near her house were going to cut through a large tree next to some power lines. The beavers had gnawed through most of the trunk of the tree, said the woman, who did not want to be named. She was afraid the tree would fall and take the power lines with it.

    "I won't let my grandchildren play in the yard," she said. "It looks like a danger to us."

    After a call to Duke Energy on Nov. 2, the tree came down later that afternoon.

  • USCL students explore unique career

    What is an actuary?

    A few students at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster got the answer to that question and learned it's a well-paying profession a lot of people don't know much about.

    Actuaries are risk-management professionals who analyze the financial and emotional impact of events.

    They evaluate the likelihood of future events, design ways to reduce the likelihood of undesirable events, and work to decrease the impact of undesirable events that do occur.

  • 'The Boy of the Waxhaws' featured on 2007 ornament

    The manager of Andrew Jackson State Park loves See Lancaster's 2007 Christmas ornament.

    "This is the best one yet," said Kirk Johnston, adding his family has been collecting the See Lancaster ornaments for several years.

    This year's ornament features an emblem of "The Boy of the Waxhaws" statue at Andrew Jackson State Park.

    Kirk said that will be "good for the marketing of the park."

    The ornament was the center of attention Thursday night as Alpine Insurance Agency and the Purple Rooster in downtown Lancaster hosted a party to unveil it.

  • Council gives non-pressure washing business a variance

    After being told last month he must stop washing buildings because of drought-related, water-use restrictions, a local man took his case to Lancaster City Council and won.

    Jeff Wilson, owner of Wilson's Roof Cleaning, spoke during the public comment period Tuesday.

    He said the water-use restrictions should not apply to his business because he doesn't use that much water.

    He asked council to overrule Public Works Director Jerry Crockett and City Administrator Helen Sowell's decision to deny his request for a variance from the water-use restrictions.