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  • Flappers and fun focus of arts gala

    You may want to brush up on your Charleston for the Lancaster County Council of the Arts' annual gala Feb. 9.

    The theme for this year's bash is Flappers, Fringe and Fabulous Fun. The black-tie optional event begins at 7 p.m. at the Bradley Arts and Sciences Building at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster.

    The gala is the arts council's largest fundraiser each year. Last year's brought in $25,000 to fund the council's programs.

  • What will become of old Belk site in downtown?

    The future of the vacant downtown Lancaster lot that was home of the Belk store for many years remains up in the air.

    One potential buyer approached the city of Lancaster to buy the lot, but the deal didn't pan out, Mayor Joe Shaw said.

    The city spent about $400,000 to demolish the building after it was deemed a public hazard by an engineering firm last year. The city then took ownership of the lot.

  • South Middle student wins district bee

    For Steven Hendryx, Thursday's district spelling bee turned out much better than the one last year.

    At the 2007 district contest, Hendryx bowed out in the first round when he misspelled the word "prairie."

    He said he was too nervous.

    But this time around, Hendryx, a seventh-grader at South Middle School, outlasted the rest in the field.

    He correctly spelled "chronology" to win the 2008 Lancaster County School District spelling bee, held at Stevens Auditorium at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster.

  • Council to consider sale of park

    County Council will consider approving the sale of Roy Hardin Park in Indian Land on Monday night.

    The 9-acre park is worth at least $1 million to the county – the minimum recommended that the county accept for the property by the Lancaster County Recreation Commission, said County Administrator Steve Willis.

    Developers want to buy the park to use it for storm-water retention for a larger development, Willis said Friday.

  • 13 educators earn National Board certification

    Long nights, tied-up weekends and time away from family are just some of the sacrifices educators make when working to earn the highest credential in the teaching profession.

    Pat McFadden will tell you it's no easy task.

    McFadden, a guidance counselor at Erwin Elementary School, and 13 others educators in the Lancaster County School District recently earned certification from the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards.

    The board develops the professional standards that define what accomplished teachers should know and be able to do.

  • Officials target underage drinking

    Underage drinking in the region is now under attack.

    That was the message from a meeting of law enforcement and behavioral/health agencies in the 6th Judicial Circuit, who met Thursday at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster to discuss progress being made by new Alcohol Enforcement Teams (AETs) to enforce the state's tougher underage drinking laws passed last year. The judicial circuit includes Lancaster, Chester and Fairfield counties.

  • Two Indian Land residents say they will file for County Council seat

    INDIAN LAND – Two Indian Land residents have announced their intentions to run for County Council District 1.

    Longtime Indian Land resident Alan Patterson and Larry McCullough, a newcomer to Sun City Carolina Lakes, told Indian Land Action Council members at their Monday night meeting that they intend to run for the seat. Both intend to run as Republicans.

    Filing for the partisan seats up for election this year will be March 17-31.

    Patterson wants to get off sidelines

  • Democrats get their say in presidential contest

    The race for the Democratic Party nomination for president is a historic one.

    For the first time in history, the two leading candidates are a woman, Hillary Clinton, and a black man, Barack Obama.

    The candidate in third place – in both the delegate race and in most polls in the state and nation – is John Edwards, the former U.S. senator from North Carolina. If Edwards won the nominee and then were elected president, he'd be the first president to claim the Palmetto State as his birthplace since Andrew Jackson. Edwards was born in Seneca.

  • Humane society off to strong start

    Two pit bull puppies were among the attendees of the Indian Land Action Council's meeting Monday night.

    The brindle and blond pups gave out happy kisses and helped drive home the message from the council's guests - members of the newly formed Humane Society of Lancaster County.

    The humane society has gone from "zero to 100 miles an hour in 90 days," said its vice president, B.J. Mishoe, who has been a volunteer at the Lancaster County Animal Shelter for the past several years.

  • Video Exclusive! Edwards says he won't ignore rural Americans

    John Edwards told a Lancaster audience Wednesday that if he's elected president, he won't forget where he came from.

    The Seneca native said rural America will be a true concern for him if he's elected.

    "You have been ignored for too long," he told a packed crowd at Bundy Auditorium at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster. "I will not ignore you as president."