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Local

  • Bass quartet enjoys Breakfast with the Arts

    Neal Zarrelli didn't know whose idea it was to bring the National Symphony Orchestra's double bass quartet to the Lancaster County Council of the Arts Gallery for a Breakfast with the Arts performance, but they got it right.

    After hearing musicians Richard Barber, Paul DeNola, Ira Gold and Jeffrey Weisner play a chamber music concert Tuesday morning, Zarrelli's stance on the effectiveness of the nation's capitol has changed somewhat.

  • Students meet the soldier they've sent care packages

    There appeared to be a strong connection between U.S. Army Spc. Gene Welch and the group of students he visited last Wednesday.

    As the Buford native spoke with a first-grade class at Clinton Elementary School, they listened intently.

    For them, it was good to finally see the person they had helped when he was a half a world away.

    Months ago, the class collected supplies to send to Welch, who served near Baghdad from last September to January. He was part of a platoon that cleared land and buildings, making sure they were safe for other soldiers to occupy.

  • Red Cross merges Lancaster with York, Chester chapter

    The Lancaster County Chapter of the American Red Cross has merged with the York and Chester county chapters to form the Upper Palmetto Chapter.

    Teresa Ackerman, executive director of the local chapter, acknowledged that the local chapter has struggled financially in recent years. Being part of a larger chapter will help meet national headquarters' fundraising expectations, she said.

    The goal for a local chapter is always to be self-sufficient, she said Friday after the merger was announced.

  • Cole to seek District 3 seat on County Council

    Buford native and resident Cotton Cole announced his candidacy for the District 3 seat on Lancaster County Council on Thursday, promising to be a "voice for the district."

    "I'm told we need a voice for the District 3, someone who will speak up," said Cole, 52, who will run as a Democrat.

    He said he'll represent the district's interests first and those of Lancaster County second. Wesley Grier, a Republican, now holds the seat.

  • Students show they care

    All of the cans that Clinton Elementary School first-graders brought in produced a total that made their teachers proud.

    The school's first grade classes collected canned goods as part of a nationwide food drive called the "Souper" Bowl of Caring. The drive started about two weeks ago and wrapped up Feb 11.

    The cans will be donated to HOPE of Lancaster Inc.

    HOPE, which stands for Helping Other People Effectively, is a nonprofit agency that assists people with food and other expenses.

  • Group considering three sites for children's park

    KERSHAW - Three sites are now being considered by a group in Kershaw who hope to create a first-rate children's park.

    Beverly Timmons, who heads the Kershaw Community Park Council, said organizers are looking at two publicly owned properties and a private piece of land in the downtown area.

    One site is a baseball field on Matson Street, now owned by Lancaster County. Another is part of the Leroy Springs Recreation Center, owned by the town of Kershaw. The final property being considered is a piece of land owned by Norfolk Southern near downtown.

  • Officials warn about fake GED services

    COLUMBIA – The national organization responsible for administering the General Educational Development tests is advising people that the GED credential cannot be earned on the Internet or through correspondence programs.

    State GED administrators nationwide have reported increasing numbers of complaints from individuals who paid steep fees to take what they thought were official GED tests, and upon passing, thought they had earned the highly recognized GED credential issued by their respective state GED testing agency.

  • Proposed ordinance on naming buildings gets cold reception

    Lancaster County resident John Baker cautioned County Council on Monday night against naming public facilities after living people.

    Baker presented an ordinance he wrote that would prohibit naming a government building, for example, after a person who is still alive. He pointed to former Lt. Gov. Earle Morris Jr., who has public facilities named after him in Columbia. The former Carolina Investors chairman was later found guilty and is now serving time for securities fraud in the downfall of Carolina Investors.

  • Great Falls 'a speed trap,' says Chester County councilman

    GREAT FALLS - Chester County Councilman Archie Lucas said motorists are afraid to drive through the town of Great Falls.

    "I had one person who lives on Wateree say they would not come to Great Falls because the police will pull you over," Lucas said.

    "Great Falls is not being considered a speed trap," Lucas said. "It is one."

    Lucas said some people mistakenly think he serves on Great Falls Town Council when they complain to him.

  • About a year remains before all TV broadcasts will be in digital format

    Some people with analog television sets are scratching their heads over how they'll continue enjoying TV once the federal government mandates all broadcasts be in digital come February 2009.

    Lone analog television sets without cable or satellite service won't be able to receive broadcasts then, but the government and other interests are now working to make analog owners aware of what can be done once the change-over goes into effect.