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Local

  • County to receive $65,000

    Lancaster County has been awarded federal funds under the Emergency Food and Shelter National Board Program.

    The county will receive $65,869 to supplement emergency food and shelter programs.

    The selection was made by a national board, chaired by the Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency, and including representatives from The Salvation Army, American Red Cross, United Jewish Communities, Catholic Charities USA, National Council of Churches of Christ in the USA and United Way of America.

  • Results of noise study loud, clear

    INDIAN LAND – To residents of Brookchase, the results of a noise study are loud and clear – the sound coming from Blue Dot and other concrete plants near their homes is excessive and violates county ordinances.

    To Lancaster County Administrator Steve Willis, it's a little more complicated.

    Brookchase residents say they have been suffering through unbearable loud noise generated from the Blue Dot concrete plant at 521 Perimeter Commerce Park since last year.

  • North Elementary to hold 10th annual Spring Fling

    ComeouttoNorthElementarySchoolonSaturdayforaneventthatisintendedtobefunforchildrenofallagesaswellasadults.The10thannualSpringFlingFestivalisfrom10a.m.to4p.m.Proceedsfromtheeventwillgotowardplaygroundequipmentforkindergartenstudentsandnewcomputersfortheschool.“It’safamilyevent,”saidTerrySchonberg,co-chairoftheSpringFlingcommittee.“There’ssomethingforeverybody.”Rockclimbing,hayridesandtracklesstrainrideswillbesetup.Therewillbenine“megarides”inall.Youwillalsogetthechancetohaveyourfacepai

  • Historic hotel in downtown Pageland goes on auction block

    PAGELAND–OneofPageland’soldestlandmarkswillbeupforauctionlaterthisweek.

  • Charlotte chamber official: Economy isn't flatlining here

    The Lancaster Rotary Club hosted Tony Crumbley, vice president of research of the Charlotte Chamber of Commerce, as its guest speaker last Thursday.

    Crumbley presented numbers to his audience that show projected growth of Lancaster County and Mecklenburg County, N.C.

    Crumbley contends that Charlotte and the surrounding region are not in a recession.

    Here's why:

    – Mecklenburg County created 14,000 new jobs last year, and 1,326 firms moved to the county.

    – North Carolina created 68,000 new jobs last year.

  • Leash law in county's future?

    County Council members and residents of Lancaster - some dog lovers and others who have been dog bite victims - are working together to rework an ordinance concerning dangerous dogs.

    Council had proposed designating all pit bulls, American bulldogs and perro de presa Canarios, or Carnary dogs, as dangerous, regardless of whether they had attacked someone or not.

  • Newspaper wins 12 awards in contest

    The Lancaster News' staffers came home with 12 awards in the S.C. Press Association's annual contest.

    Newsroom employees received their awards during a luncheon in Spartanburg on Friday. The entries were judged by newspaper employees in West Virginia.

  • Cost of beer leads to fight at local bar

    A Lancaster man went to jail Wednesday after an aggravated assault stemming from an argument over the cost of beer at a bar.

    William Kevin Todd, 40, of 1684 Lynwood Drive, was charged by the Lancaster County Sheriff's Office with aggravated assault and battery and assault with intent to kill.

  • In Lancaster County politics, men have always dominated, but women have made gains in recent years

    If elected president, U.S. Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton of New York will be the first woman chosen for the country's top office.

    Nancy Pelosi is the first female speaker of the U.S. House.

    If elected state senator, Lancaster attorney Mandy Powers-Norrell will make history of her own. A woman has never been elected to represent Lancaster County in the state Senate or House in Columbia. There have been few women candidates to even make a run for the state offices.

  • Middle school students see how adults earn a living

    INDIAN LAND – Indian Land Middle School students had a chance to practice being taxpayers Feb. 26. Some of them did not have to go very far.

    Brittany Perez shadowed her mom, seventh-grade ILMS math and science teacher Lisa Bachini.

    Bachini said her daughter thought it was a little boring. Perez has no clue what she wants to be when she grows up, but says it probably won't be a teacher.

    Four students went to Indian Land Elementary School to shadow faculty and staff.