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Local

  • Badcock to move to old Wal-Mart building soon

    Badcock Home Furnishing Center is preparing to move to a new building that will be more than triple the size of its existing location.

    The Badcock furniture store on South Main Street will relocate to the old Wal-Mart building on S.C. 9 Bypass. Owner Cliff Altman said the store may be open at the new location by May 1.

    Badcock’s new store will have 24,000 square feet of showroom space. The warehouse will be 10,000 square feet, and the clearance center will measure about 6,000 square feet, Altman said.

  • Council divided on new development on the Catawba

    A lack of growth in western Lancaster County versus a greater demand for services and a burden on schools – those issues divided County Council on a vote for a new residential development on the Catawba River.

    Council voted 4-3 in favor of final reading of a rezoning ordinance, giving Texas-based LGI Land the go-ahead to develop Riverchase Estates, a gated community on Riverside Road.

    Riverchase Estates will contain 1,250 to 1,939 homes on about 2,000 acres along the Catawba.

  • 60 students receive Principals' Choice honors

    The hugs were plentiful. Smiles were a mainstay and some people shed tears.

    The evening was all about the children in Lancaster County who’ve made strides toward excellence and the proud parents, teachers and others who support them along the way.

    On Thursday, the three Rotary clubs in Lancaster County held the third annual Principals’ Choice Awards – an honor that recognizes students for achievement in and outside the classroom. The ceremony was held in a packed Bundy Auditorium at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster.

  • City modifies intern program to include maintenance work

    For local college students wanting get to work experience with local government, the city of Lancaster offers an internship program especially for them.

    Starting in June, three students will be able to work full time for 10 weeks in administrative and other capacities for the city. The pay is $7 per hour.

    City Council reviewed the program and agreed on a few changes in a unanimous vote Tuesday.

    Council voted to allow supervisors to ask the interns to do maintenance, like lawn work and plant watering, and other work, such as for the fire and police departments.

  • Council to discuss bond proposal

    County Council will discuss forming a committee Monday that will recommend capital projects that should be included in a November referendum.

    Council is considering a 1-cent sales tax to pay for projects, such as building a new courthouse, expanding the main library and public works facilities, improving utility lines in the county’s municipalities.

    A courthouse could cost at least $20 million. Because the county can’t borrow money for all the projects, the public would vote on a bond package during the general election in November.

  • Springs Memorial looking to honor a special nurse

    Springs Memorial Hospital’s Patient Choice Award will recognize the quality care, comfort and compassion offered by its nurses, honoring one nurse in particular.

    Continuing the tradition of the last few years, this program, which solicits input from the community, will culminate with one nurse at Springs Memorial receiving the Patient Choice Award during Nurses’ Week, May 6-12.

    Why would SMH be asking former patients to be so involved in spotlighting an exceptional nurse, rather than making the choice internally?

  • City ponders clock tower funding

    Lancaster City Council is moving forward on a project to create a monument to Springs Industries’ Lancaster Plant and the employees who worked at the plant for many years.

    While the mill is now gone, its tower clock has been refurbished and the city is now hoping to place it inside a monument that will stand somewhere in downtown Lancaster.

    City Administrator Helen Sowell said the majority of council wants the monument on the island in Elm Street that faces Main Street from the west. That would be part of an effort to beautify the southern part of downtown, she said.

  • Event draws folks to check out works of local artists

    Art aficionados strolled around downtown Lancaster’s galleries Friday night for a new event sponsored by the Lancaster County Council of the Arts, called the Spring Arts Draw.

    Art lovers checked out the unique vases by Ben Davison and the shadowy, two-dimensional works of Michael Ehlbeck at the Springs House, home of the Lancaster County Council of the Arts. Then it was on to Picture Perfect on Catawba Street, where many shared a laugh with the owner of the picture-framing business, Mark Plyler.

  • Two face drug charges after warrants executed

    Two Lancaster County men were arrested on several drug charges after separate search warrants were executed Thursday.

    John Ervin Carnes II, 21, of 2331 Old Blackmon Lane, was charged with possession with intent to distribute marijuana, possession with intent to distribute crack cocaine, trafficking cocaine between 28 and 100 grams, distribution of cocaine and possession of a firearm during the commission of a violent crime.

  • Lancaster losing old Burger King, but will get new one

    Lancaster’s Burger King restaurant is about to undergo a whopper of a makeover.

    The popular fast food restaurant located on North Main Street will close Monday so it can be torn down and rebuilt.

    Burger King spokeswoman Denise Wilson said the new building will feature an open-view ceiling and a double drive-thru.

    “It’s more efficient and modern-looking,” Wilson said. “It’s a great new look for the restaurant.”